GOP lawmaker says he has enough support to force immigration votes

GOP lawmaker says he has enough support to force immigration votes
© Greg Nash

A Republican congressman said Tuesday he’s rounded up enough GOP co-sponsors to force multiple immigration votes on the House floor.

Rep. Jeff DenhamJeffrey (Jeff) John DenhamGOP immigration compromise faces more hurdles in House Immigration compromise underlines right’s clout GOP centrists face decision day on Dreamer petition MORE (R-Calif.) told The Hill that he has secured support from more than 40 House Republicans on a resolution that would allow debate and votes on four separate immigration proposals.

ADVERTISEMENT

The four bills that would be considered are the conservative bill authored by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteTrump digs in amid uproar on zero tolerance policy Schumer warns 'House moderates' against immigration compromise bill The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — Furor grows over child separation policy MORE (R-Va.); a Democratic measure that would be the Dream Act; a bill offered by Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanTrump digs in amid uproar on zero tolerance policy Mark Sanford’s troubles did not begin with Trump NY Post blasts Trump, GOP over separating families at border MORE (R-Wis.) that would mirror President TrumpDonald John Trump20 weeks out from midterms, Dems and GOP brace for surprises Sessions responds to Nazi comparisons: 'They were keeping the Jews from leaving' Kim Jong Un to visit Beijing this week MORE’s immigration plan; and the bipartisan USA Act, a narrow bill limited to border security measures and protecting so-called Dreamers.

“It’s time for us to have a full debate in front of the American public,” Denham told The Hill.

Denham's resolution would initiate the “Queen of the Hill” rule, under which the bill that receives the most votes and surpasses the 218-vote threshold would be adopted by the House. If all bills fail to reach 218, they all would be rejected.

With 41 Republican votes and all Democrats in support, the rule could be forced through without going through committee or gaining approval from leadership.

At least 218 votes — a simple majority of the 435 members of the House — are needed to force a vote without consent from the House leadership, what's known as a discharge petition. All 192 Democrats are expected to support the effort, but Denham said his Democratic ally, Rep. Pete AguilarPeter (Pete) Ray AguilarImmigration compromise underlines right’s clout Pelosi, Dems hammer GOP for ‘derailing’ DACA debate Hoyer warns GOP: Don’t dabble with DACA compromise bill MORE (Calif.), is still rounding up co-sponsors on his side of the aisle.

Denham’s announcement came on the same day Ryan and his leadership team held an in-depth discussion behind closed doors about the immigration issue, GOP leaders told The Hill.

Leaders said they were trying to make “tweaks” to the Goodlatte bill to make it more palatable to a broader array of the GOP conference. The legislation currently doesn’t have the votes to pass the House.

GOP sources said the leadership discussion was spurred by Trump’s tweets and other public comments demanding Congress fund his border wall. Trump canceled the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and called on Congress to find a legislative replacement.

But because of a court injunction, DACA recipients still have their benefits. Other Dreamers, undocumented immigrants who came to the country as minors, are still subject to deportation.

“We continue to work toward a viable solution that addresses both DACA and securing our border,” said Ryan spokeswoman AshLee Strong.

The Goodlatte bill would tighten border security and interior enforcement, and it would grant renewable three-year permits to DACA recipients, but wouldn't give them a special pathway to citizenship.

The Dream Act, co-sponsored by Reps. Lucille Roybal Allard (D-Calif.) and Ileana Ros-LehtinenIleana Carmen Ros-LehtinenTrump immigration comments spark chaos in GOP More than 100 bipartisan lawmakers urge Pruitt to scrap 'secret science' rule GOP doubles female recruits for congressional races MORE (R-Fla.), would grant an automatic special path to citizenship to more than 3 million Dreamers.

The USA Act, co-sponsored by Reps. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdWhite House faces growing outcry over migrant family policies Dem lawmakers make surprise visit to ICE detention center Bannon on migrant family separation: Zero tolerance doesn't have to be justified MORE (R-Texas) and Peter Aguilar (D-Calif.), would combine elements of the Dream Act with border security provisions, but not interior enforcement.

“If it's a viable solution and it doesn't cross our red lines, then we'd be willing to get on board with it. And this qualifies,” said a House Democratic aide who’s familiar with the issue.

Melanie Zanona contributed.

This post was corrected at 11:33 p.m. to clarify that Denham's resolution is not itself a discharge petition, but a rule that would initiate "Queen of the Hill" proceedings.