Dem says frosted glass indicates lack of 'transparency' at CFPB

Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyWho watches the ‘watchdog?’ It's time for accountability for the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection Five GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump suggests China is easing pressure on North Korea because of trade fight | Mulvaney taps top aide as No. 2 at consumer bureau | House Republican to offer bill to curtail Trump's trade powers MORE, the acting head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), defended on Wednesday a decision to put frosted glass on the windows of his office, after he was confronted for a lack of "transparency" by Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonHillicon Valley: Trump tries to quell Russia furor | Sparks fly at hearing on social media | First House Republican backs net neutrality bill | Meet the DNC's cyber guru | Sinclair defiant after merger setback Dem lawmaker blasts Amazon over sale of white-supremacist merchandise The Memo: Bannon says court win vindicates Trump MORE (D-Minn.).

Ellison questioned Mulvaney at a House Financial Services Committee hearing about the decision to install frosted glass on the windows of 13 offices at the CFPB, asking whether doing so undermined his commitment to transparency. 

"You are the champion of transparency, right?" Ellison asked. "And yet you have obscured yourself physically, and I find that to be ironic, sir."

ADVERTISEMENT

Mulvaney said the windows of 13 offices had been frosted in recent months at a cost of $3,500. The frosted windows, he said, were part of a plan put together under his predecessor at the CFPB, Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayLiberals view Kavanaugh as existential threat to consumer bureau Mulvaney appoints top aide as consumer bureau acting No. 2 On The Money: Strong June as economy adds 213K jobs | China blames Trump for 'biggest trade war' in history | Consumer bureau deputy to resign, end legal fight with Trump MORE.

Mulvaney then fired back at Ellison, asking whether the door to his office is transparent. 

"I’m not a witness today. You are," Ellison replied. 

"I’ve been to your office. I can’t see into it," Mulvaney quipped. 

The Associated Press reported Tuesday that the CFPB had spent $6,000 to frost the office windows of senior staff in recent months. The bureau reportedly ordered the film used to frost the windows in September 2017, before Cordray left the agency, and again in February, after Mulvaney took over.