House chaplain rescinds resignation

House Chaplain Patrick Conroy has retracted his resignation from the post, arguing he did nothing to deserve being pushed out last month by Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanHillicon Valley: Mnuchin urges antitrust review of tech | Progressives want to break up Facebook | Classified election security briefing set for Tuesday | Tech CEOs face pressure to appear before Congress Feehery: An opening to repair our broken immigration system GOP chairman in talks with 'big pharma' on moving drug pricing bill MORE (R-Wis.) and wishes to remain at least through the end of the year, when his term expires. 
 
“I have never been disciplined, nor reprimanded, nor have I ever heard a complaint about my ministry during my time as House Chaplain,” Conroy wrote in his letter to Ryan on Thursday. Ryan later said he had "accepted" the letter and would allow Conroy to stay on.
 
“It is my desire to continue to serve as House Chaplain … to the end of my current two-year term, and beyond, unless my services are officially terminated (however that is properly done) or I am not re-elected to the position by the membership of the House,” Conroy wrote.
 
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In the letter, Conroy, a Jesuit priest appointed in 2011, said Ryan’s chief of staff, Jonathan Burks, approached the chaplain last month requesting his resignation on behalf of Ryan, himself a Catholic. 
 
Conroy said Burks gave no specific cause, but suggested it was time for a non-Catholic to fill the chaplain post.
 
“I inquired as to whether or not it was ‘for cause,’ and Mr. Burks mentioned dismissively something like ‘maybe it’s time that we had a Chaplain that wasn’t Catholic,’ ” Conroy wrote.
 
The Washington Post first reported on Conroy's letter.
 
In a statement Thursday afternoon, Ryan said he had "accepted Father Conroy’s letter and decided that he will remain in his position," pledging to sit down with him next week.
 
"My original decision was made in what I believed to be the best interest of this institution," Ryan said. "To be clear, that decision was based on my duty to ensure that the House has the kind of pastoral services that it deserves. It is my job as speaker to do what is best for this body, and I know that this body is not well served by a protracted fight over such an important post."
 
Conroy’s resignation ignited a firestorm on Capitol Hill last week after it was revealed that Ryan’s office had forced him out without providing a reason, even to Conroy himself. Ryan, in a closed-door meeting with Republicans, explained that he’d heard complaints from members that Conroy had neglected their “pastoral needs.”
 
Catholics in both parties condemned the move, and Democrats took to the House floor in a dramatic attempt to force the creation of a select committee to examine the reasons for Conroy’s ouster. The measure failed, largely along party lines. 
 
The controversy deepened when Rep. Mark WalkerBradley (Mark) Mark WalkerKey House chairman floats changes to immigration bill Food stamp revamp sparks GOP fight over farm bill House chaplain is a champion of true Catholicism — Paul Ryan is not MORE (R-N.C.), a Baptist minister who heads the Republican Study Committee, had suggested the House chaplain should have a wife and kids in order to relate better to the needs of lawmakers — a stipulation that would exclude Catholics like Conroy, who take an oath of celibacy.  
 
Ryan had initially appointed Walker as part of the panel charged with recommending Conroy’s replacement. Amid the furor over his remarks, Walker resigned from that spot over the weekend.
 
Ryan has defended the decision to ask for the priest's resignation, saying it was "based on feedback" he received from members.

Conroy, however, said that Ryan had warned him to “stay out of politics” after he delivered a prayer on the House floor about the GOP tax bill.

In his Thursday letter, Conroy cited remarks Ryan gave that his "spiritual counseling" had been found lacking. 

"In fact, no such criticism has ever been leveled against me during my tenure," Conroy wrote.

“Had I known of any failure in providing my ministry to the House, I would have attempted to make appropriate adjustments, but in no case would I have agreed to submit a letter of resignation without being given that opportunity.”

Conroy’s supporters in both parties were quick to hail the chaplain’s fight to remain in place. 

“I applaud Father Pat in his decision and stand by my support of him,” Rep. Tom ReedThomas (Tom) W. ReedGOP split on immigration is a crisis for Ryan’s team House chaplain rescinds resignation Ryan on chaplain's dismissal: 'This is not about politics or prayers' MORE (R-N.Y.), one of two Republicans to support the Democrats’ push for an investigation, said Thursday in an email.

Conroy’s reference to the “proper” process for removing a House chaplain has been the subject of some debate over the past week. While House rules clearly stipulate that the Speaker has the power to remove certain officials from their posts — including the clerk, sergeant-at-arms and chief administrative officer — the chaplain is not clearly listed. And Democrats, and some Republicans, insist Ryan lacks that authority. 

“The chaplain is handled differently than certain other officers of the House,” Rep. Marcy KapturMarcia (Marcy) Carolyn KapturDems put squeeze on Ryan over chaplain controversy House chaplain rescinds resignation Religious tensions flare after chaplain's ouster MORE (D-Ohio) said last week. “There has been no charge of wrongdoing. And if there was, then we need to know what it is.”

Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.), a Methodist minister who was tapped to join the search for Conroy’s replacement, has also been adamant that Conroy, elected by the full House, cannot be removed without cause at the whims of the Speaker. The concern among Democrats is that Ryan’s move will politicize the chaplain position, setting a precedent for ritual firings whenever the House changes hands.

Rep. Bill PascrellWilliam (Bill) James PascrellPush for NAFTA deal continues as uncertainty increases Dems put squeeze on Ryan over chaplain controversy Five ways Dems could fight Trump if they win the House MORE (N.J.), another Catholic Democrat, was more critical, accusing Ryan of pandering to the conservative evangelicals in the GOP conference.

“The feeble excuses offered by Speaker Ryan are merely a pretext to cover for the whims of extremists in his caucus,”  Pascrell said Thursday in a statement. 

After reports emerged that Ryan had forced Conroy out, Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiDems expand 2018 message to ‘draining the swamp’ McCarthy denies that he's discussed plan to force out Ryan Juan Williams: Trump gives life to the left MORE (D-Calif.), also a Catholic, said through a spokesman that she “made it clear to Speaker Ryan that she disagreed with this decision.”

Conroy has served as the official House chaplain since being appointed by former Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerGOP revolts multiply against retiring Ryan Can Jim Jordan become top House Republican? Tensions on immigration erupt in the House GOP MORE (R-Ohio), another Catholic, in 2011. His resignation had been set to take effect on May 24.

Conroy told The New York Times last month that Ryan's staff was upset over his November prayer about the tax law, in which he urged fairness as lawmakers decided where the benefits should fall. Conroy mentioned the prayer again in his Thursday letter, saying Burks mentioned that invocation as well as an interview the chaplain had given to National Journal Daily.

“May all members be mindful that the institutions and structures of our great nation guarantee the opportunities that have allowed some to achieve great success, while others continue to struggle,” the chaplain stated on the floor at the time. “May their efforts these days guarantee that there are not winners and losers under new tax laws, but benefits balanced and shared by all Americans.”

 
Melanie Zanona contributed. Updated at 5:59 p.m.