House postpones vote on compromise immigration bill

House Republican leaders are delaying a vote on a compromise immigration bill until Friday as leaders struggle to secure 218 votes for the measure.

Some Republicans had pressed leadership to push back the Thursday vote on the compromise measure so that they could have more time to review the package, which is the product of weeks of negotiations between centrists and conservatives.

Lawmakers were frustrated that they didn't have more time to read the nearly 300-page bill that was released Tuesday, while others complained that Majority Whip Rep. Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseGOP leaders jockey for affection of House conservatives Five GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus Overnight Energy: House to vote on anti-carbon tax measure | Dem says EPA obstructed 'politically charged' FOIA requests | GOP looks to overhaul endangered species law MORE (R-La.) didn't have enough time to build support for the measure.

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Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloMueller indictments: Congressional candidate asked Russian operatives for info on opponent Lawmakers discuss efforts to boost Latino entrepreneurship On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump suggests China is easing pressure on North Korea because of trade fight | Mulvaney taps top aide as No. 2 at consumer bureau | House Republican to offer bill to curtail Trump's trade powers MORE (R-Fla.), one of the lead centrist negotiators on the compromise immigration bill, said he did not oppose pushing the vote to Friday, as long as it doesn't get pushed back any further.

There will also be a conferencewide meeting on immigration at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, which will give GOP leaders one last chance to rally the party around the legislation and convince the remaining holdouts to get on board with the plan.

The compromise measure would provide a pathway to citizenship for up to 1.8 millions "Dreamers," provide $25 billion for President TrumpDonald John TrumpSasse: Trump shouldn't dignify Putin with Helsinki summit Top LGBT group projects message onto Presidential Palace in Helsinki ahead of Trump-Putin summit Hillary Clinton to Trump ahead of Putin summit: 'Do you know which team you play for?' MORE's border wall and other security measures as well as prevent families from being separated at the border.

The House earlier Thursday rejected a more hard-line immigration measure from Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteFormer FBI lawyer Lisa Page gets closed-door grilling from House Republicans 5 takeaways from wild hearing with controversial FBI agent GOP lawmaker asks FBI agent about lying to wife over affair MORE (R-Va.).

Tensions over immigration had reached a boiling point on Wednesday, when Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsFive GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus Former FBI lawyer Lisa Page gets closed-door grilling from House Republicans Conservatives moving to impeach Rosenstein soon: report MORE (R-N.C.) was seen having a heated argument with Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanGOP leaders jockey for affection of House conservatives Five GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump walks back criticism of UK Brexit strategy | McConnell worries US in 'early stages' of trade war | US trade deficit with China hits new record MORE (R-Wis.) on the House floor.

Meadows was furious that the final compromise immigration package left out several provisions that had been agreed to during earlier negotiations. Conservatives are also upset that leadership brought the original version of the Goodlatte bill to the floor instead of a modified version that was designed to win more support.

“The problem is, they kept saying, 'It’s in there, it’s in there.' I read the entire bill and only with less than 24 hours before a vote did I find out that indeed it wasn’t in there,” Meadows said Thursday in an interview with Hill.TV's show "Rising.”

“And I felt like it was going back on their word on what would actually be in the text. I don’t think I should be led one way and then find out differently,” he said.

In a sign of just how rushed the process has been, the House Rules Committee had to hold an emergency session late Wednesday night to fix a drafting error in the Goodlatte bill that would have authorized $125 billion for Trump's border wall instead of $25 billion.

Republicans are also grappling with the family separation crisis created by Trump's "zero tolerance" immigration policy. While Trump signed an executive order Wednesday to end the practice of separating children from their parents at the border, lawmakers still say a legislative fix is necessary.

If the GOP measure fails, as is expected, House Republicans could face immense pressure to pass a stand-alone fix for the family separation issue.

Updated at 2:34 p.m.