Washington Post op-ed: So much for Trump's promise to 'be there every day' for Puerto Rico

Washington Post op-ed: So much for Trump's promise to 'be there every day' for Puerto Rico
© Getty Images

The Washington Post on Thursday published an op-ed urging Congress to give Puerto Rico the resources it needs in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

The piece, published Thursday, comes after President Trump earlier in the day warned that his administration's response to Puerto Rico cannot last "forever."

The Washington Post wrote in its editorial that a majority of the population in Puerto Rico is still without power; many don't have access to clean water.

ADVERTISEMENT
"If the Americans enduring these conditions lived in Connecticut or Montana or Arkansas, would we be counseling patience?" the editorial board asked.

"Would we be blithely accepting predictions of another month — or more — to get the power restored? No."

The editorial said if that were the case, there would be constant media coverage and the president "certainly wouldn't be threatening to abandon federal relief efforts."

"The state of affairs would simply be seen as unacceptable, which it is," the editorial said.

"The 3.4 million American citizens who live in Puerto Rico are owed a far better response from their government than they have gotten these past three weeks," the op-ed read.

The editorial chides President Trump for his tweets earlier Thursday, when he said: "We cannot keep [the Federal Emergency Management Agency], the Military & the First Responders, who have been amazing (under the most difficult circumstances) in P.R. forever!" 

"So much for his promise to 'be there every day' until the people of Puerto Rico are 'safe and sound and secure,'" the editorial board wrote.

"It is time to stop treating the people of Puerto Rico like second-class citizens. Congress should give Puerto Rico the resources it needs," they wrote.

The piece also called for Congress to demand answers on why so many Americans are still "living in misery with so little hope for the future" three weeks after the hurricane struck.