Fox military analyst: 'Nikki Haley may end up as our first female president'

Fox military analyst Ralph Peters hailed U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyTreasury retweets Trump, possibly violating campaign law UN human rights chief: Trump’s anti-press rhetoric is ‘very close to incitement to violence’ Who guards the guardians? MORE on Fox Business on Thursday, declaring that the former South Carolina governor "may end up our first female president."

Peters praised Haley for taking a tough stance following the U.N.'s opposition to U.S. recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital but also cautioned against the U.S. making threats it's "not prepared to carry out."

The U.N. in a 128–9 vote on Thursday overwhelmingly rebuked President TrumpDonald John TrumpBrennan fires new shot at Trump: ‘He’s drunk on power’ Trump aides discussed using security clearance revocations to distract from negative stories: report Trump tried to dissuade Melania from 'Be Best' anti-bullying campaign: report MORE's decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Thirty-five countries abstained from voting.

"Is this like a game of chicken? They’re saying, ‘We don’t want you to do this,’ but we’re saying, ‘We have the money here. If you want to continue to be supported by us, you’re going to let us do what we want,’” said "Intelligence Report" host Trish Regan.

“Well, let me preface it by saying I think Nikki Haley may end up as our first female president," replied Peters, a retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel and Fox contributor.

Peters also suggested that moving the embassy could have been handled more delicately.

"I fully support moving our embassy to Jerusalem and God knows we can use a tougher line at the U.N. But I think we could have handled this particular case a little bit better," he cautioned. 

"I’ll give you three rules from coal town bar fights. One, pick your fights wisely. Two, pick fights you can win. And three, don’t make threats you’re not prepared to carry out," he continued.

"In this case, this was not a important vote, this was a U.N. tantrum, the kind of stuff they do all the time, politically correct kind of things.

"Two, there’s no way any threats or anything else could make Muslim countries vote with us on this because they stirred up so much anti-Israel hatred among their own people.

"And third, the threat was ill-advised by cutting funding. We may cut some U.N. funding. We’re certainly not going to cut funding to countries like Jordan or even Egypt at a critical time like this."

Some of the United States' closest allies voted against the U.S. decision, including the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Japan. 

Allies including Canada, Mexico and Australia abstained. 

Israel, Guatemala, Honduras, Micronesia, Nauru, Palau, Marshall Islands and Togo all supported the U.S. decision.