Roseanne Barr faces backlash over Trump conspiracy theory tweet

Actress Roseanne Barr faced heavy criticism on social media this weekend after posting a tweet apparently indicating support for an online conspiracy theory claiming President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: Meetings on potential North Korea summit going 'very well' Freed American 'overwhelmed with gratitude' after being released from Venezuela Ivanka Trump to campaign for Devin Nunes in California MORE is involved in combating a global trafficking ring tied to the "deep state."

In a tweet posted Friday night, the "Roseanne" star alleged that Trump was breaking up human trafficking rings and freeing "hundreds" of children in sex slavery around the world every month.

"President Trump has freed so many children held in bondage to pimps all over this world. Hundreds each month. He has broken up trafficking rings in high places everywhere. notice that. I disagree on some things, but give him benefit of doubt-4 now," the actress wrote.

Barr's tweet was initially met with widespread confusion, with New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman tweeting simply, "What?"

Journalists quickly noted that Barr's claim appeared to indicate her support for a conspiracy theory that alleges the existence of a massive child-trafficking ring linked to rogue elements in the government tied to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump lashes out at 'rigged' Russia probe in pair of tweets Clapper: 'More and more' of Steele dossier proving to be true Republicans are strongly positioned to win Congress in November MORE and the Democratic Party.

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The conspiracy has been traced to an anonymous user identified as "Q" or "QAnon" on the online message board 4Chan. Twitter users noted that Barr has mentioned Q in past tweets as recently as November.

The conspiracy theory is similar to the "Pizzagate" theory that led to a man firing shots inside a Washington, D.C., pizzeria in 2016 in an attempt to "investigate" the claims.

Barr's tweet led to backlash from members of the media, Democrats and other public figures, including former Nixon White House counsel John Dean, who slammed Barr's network, ABC, for giving her a platform.

Michael Tomaso, a former MSNBC producer, wrote back, calling the president that Barr was praising "fictional."

"This fictional president sounds amazing! Especially compared to the real one who’s been repeatedly retweeting white supremacist linked groups the last two years," he wrote.

"Where is the evidence for this???? As far as I can tell this is completely untrue. Name times and places please," wrote former Democratic National Committee chair Howard Dean.

Despite the criticism, Barr later doubled down on the message, but said she would refrain from mentioning it further because it invited "bullying" from critics.

"i thought today was a good day to talk about freeing kids from sex slavery, since it is Passover. I didn't realize that so many were not aware of it. Anyway, no more opinions from me on twitter, it invites bullying. Moving on," she wrote in a tweet late Friday.

Barr, an outspoken supporter of the president on social media, spoke with Trump as recently as Wednesday when the president called the actress to congratulate her on the ratings success of the reboot of her show, "Roseanne."

The show prominently features Barr's politics as a Trump supporter, while other members of her on-screen family tend to be more liberal.

“We just kind of had a private conversation but we talked about a lot of things and he’s just happy for me,” Barr later told ABC’s “Good Morning America" of the call.