Votes, days tick away on Iraq bill

House Democratic leaders pressed undecided lawmakers yesterday to support the Iraq war supplemental spending bill, which House leaders expect to vote on this evening.   

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But the House Rules Committee had not met by late yesterday afternoon, a clear indication that Democratic leaders do not yet have the votes to pass the bill. House rules require lawmakers to have 24 hours to read legislation before it is considered on the floor, so the later the Rules Committee meets, the later Thursday or possibly Friday the House would vote.

“We’re close, but not there yet,” a House Democratic leadership aide conceded.

Senior Democratic lawmakers predicted they would have the votes before going to the floor, but conceded that, like the previous Republican majority, they might have to proceed without the requisite number of votes already in the bag and hope that the act of voting would persuade lawmakers to support their leaders’ bill.

Anti-war liberals are not optimistic about defeating the $124 billion measure. “It probably will [pass],” said Rep. Lynn Woolsey (D-Calif.), the co-chairwoman of the Progressive Caucus and a founding member of the Out of Iraq Caucus. “If it goes to Rules they probably do have the votes.”

Rep. Rahm Emanuel (D-Ill.), the Democratic Caucus chairman, said, “Thursday or Friday, we’ll have the vote this week.”
The leadership’s vote round-up was given a boost this week by MoveOn.org’s decision to back the bill, which gave liberal lawmakers cover, and by the support of former Rep. Lee Hamilton (D-Ind.), who wrote in a letter to members of Congress, “This resolution provides a light at the end of the tunnel. It is not perfect, but it moves our national debate forward.”

Democratic leaders have held dozens of formal and informal meetings this week as they tried to get to 218 votes. President Jimmy Carter’s national security adviser, Zbigniew Brzezinski, encouraged House Democrats yesterday to support the supplemental spending bill.

Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) spoke to the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC) yesterday to make the case for the supplemental. While most of the 21 members will probably vote for the supplemental, some are undecided.

The Massachusetts delegation met on Tuesday to discuss the supplemental, but two undecided lawmakers, Reps. James McGovern and Michael Capuano, did not attend. Despite the liberals’ glum forecast and consultations, getting to 218 votes is not going to be easy for leadership.

“This is not an issue where it’s going to be easy to move people [because it’s a question of what you believe],” Rep. Jim McDermottJames (Jim) Adelbert McDermottLobbying World Dem lawmaker: Israel's accusations start of 'war on the American government' Dem to Trump on House floor: ‘Stop tweeting’ MORE (D-Wash.) said, adding that lawmakers who vote against the measure will survive politically.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) indicated to McDermott on Tuesday in a brief conversation that she would like him to support the measure. McDermott said he is undecided.

He was not the only one making up his mind, or playing coy about what he intended to do when the bill hit the floor. Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.) said he had made up his mind, but he would not say which way. Freshman Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), who attended a press conference earlier this month with opponents of the supplemental, also told reporters he had made up his mind how he would vote, but he was not willing to tell.

“I’m not ready to discuss it,” he said. “I have made up my mind, but I’m still listening.”

Ellison told Brzezinski that voting for the bill is a vote for the war. Brzezinski replied that voting against the bill would continue the war and send the wrong message to the Iraqi government.

Some lawmakers were considering voting “present,” which would lower the vote total needed, meaning they wouldn’t be voting for the funding, but would still ease its passage.

“I’ve heard that there’s been some talk about that,” said Rep. Maurice Hinchey (D-N.Y.), a liberal member of both the Progressive and Out of Iraq caucuses. Woolsey said, “To me, ‘present’ is a non-vote.”

Rep. Jim MoranJames (Jim) Patrick MoranLawmakers, media serve up laughs at annual 'Will on the Hill' Dems face close polls in must-win Virginia Billionaire Trump donor hires lobbyists to help vets MORE (D-Va.) dismissed the idea, saying, “I don’t think that’s going to happen. Most of the people who are undecided are not wimps.”

Reps. Jo Ann Davis (R-Va.) and Paul Kanjorski (D-Pa.) are expected to miss the vote because of health reasons.
Hinchey also said members have been told that if the bill fails, Democratic leaders would submit a bill with the president’s request that would pass with the help of Republicans.

“If this doesn’t pass, whatever we do pass is going to be much weaker,” Hinchey said.

House GOP leaders sent a letter to Pelosi yesterday requesting that the supplemental be considered under an open rule and that the Speaker allow four days of debate.

Heidi Bruggink, Alex Harrison and Jackie Kucinich contributed to this report.

Progressives and Blue Dogs weigh in on war-funding bill

Yes or leaning yes
Neil Abercrombie (Hawaii)
Michael Arcuri (N.Y.)
Joe Baca (Calif.)
Melissa Bean (Ill.)
Nancy Boyda (Kan.)
Corrine BrownCorrine BrownFormer Florida rep sentenced to five years in prison for fraud, tax evasion Genuine veteran charities face a challenge beating the fakes Former Florida rep found guilty of tax evasion, fraud MORE (Fla.)
Dennis Cardoza (Calif.)
Emanuel Cleaver (Mo.)
Peter DeFazio (Ore.)
Chet Edwards (Texas)
Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandSenate moving ahead with border bill, despite Trump Dem presidential hopefuls seize on Trump border policy Actress Marcia Gay Harden urges Congress to boost Alzheimer's funding MORE (N.Y.)
Phil Hare (Ill.)
Tim Mahoney (Fla.) (leaning yes)
Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoDemocrats protest Trump's immigration policy from Senate floor Fourth Senate Dem calls for Nielsen to resign over family separation policy Dem lawmaker calls on Nielsen to resign over ‘volume of lies’ about family separations MORE (Hawaii) (leaning yes)
Steve Kagen (Wis.)
Tom Lantos (Calif.)
John Larson (Conn.)
Carolyn Maloney (N.Y.)
Charlie Melancon (La.)
George Miller (Calif.)
Juanita Millender-McDonald (Calif.)
Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyOvernight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Governors criticize Trump move on pre-existing conditions Bipartisan group of senators asks FDA to examine drug shortages Trump faces Father’s Day pleas to end separations of migrant families MORE (Conn.)
Patrick Murphy (Pa.)
Jerrold Nadler (N.Y.)
Donald Payne (N.J.)
John Salazar (Colo.)
Loretta Sanchez (Calif.)
Jan Schakowsky (Ill.)
David Scott (Ga.)
Joe Sestak (Pa.)
Carol Shea-Porter (N.H.)
Bennie Thompson (Miss.)
Tim Walz (Minn.)
Charlie Wilson (Ohio)
Al Wynn (Md.)

No or leaning no
Dan Boren (Okla.) (leaning no)
Keith Ellison (Minn.) (leaning no)
Dennis Kucinich (Ohio)
Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeeLive coverage: Justice IG testifies before House on report criticizing FBI Merkley leads Dem lawmakers to border amid migrant policy outcry This week: House GOP regroups after farm bill failure MORE (Texas)
Barbara Lee (Calif.)
John Lewis (Ga.)
Jim Marshall (Ga.)
Pete Stark (Calif.)
Edolphus Towns (N.Y.)
Lynn Woolsey (Calif.)

Undecided/no comment
Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinMembers of Congress demand new federal gender pay audit Ellison introduces bill to curb stock buybacks Dem Senate super PAC reserves million in fall TV ads MORE (Wis.)
John BarrowJohn Jenkins BarrowOur democracy can’t afford to cut legal aid services from the budget Dem files Ethics complaint on Benghazi panel Barrow thanks staff in farewell speech MORE (Ga.)
Sanford Bishop Jr.Sanford Dixon BishopCBC dislikes Jarrett's message Administration courts CBC on Syria With eye on ending Hill gridlock, 81 lawmakers rally to back bipartisan bills MORE (Ga.)
Leonard Boswell (Iowa)
Mike Capuano (Mass.)
Julia Carson (Ind.)
Chris Carney (Pa.)
Jim Cooper (Tenn.)
Lacy Clay (Mo.)
Steve Cohen (Tenn.)
John Conyers Jr. (Mich.)
Henry Cuellar (Texas)
Elijah Cummings (Md.)
Danny Davis (Ill.)
Lincoln Davis (Tenn.)
William Delahunt (Mass.)
Lloyd Doggett (Texas)
Joe DonnellyJoseph (Joe) Simon DonnellyElection Countdown: Family separation policy may haunt GOP in November | Why Republican candidates are bracing for surprises | House Dems rake in record May haul | 'Dumpster fire' ad goes viral Actress Marcia Gay Harden urges Congress to boost Alzheimer's funding Manchin becomes final Democrat to back bill preventing separation of immigrant families MORE (Ind.)
Brad Ellsworth (Ind.)
Chaka Fattah (Pa.)
Bob Filner (Calif.
Barney Frank (Mass.)
Raúl Grijalva (Ariz.)
John Hall (N.Y.)
Jane Harman (Calif.)
Stephanie Herseth (S.D.)
Baron Hill (Ind.)
Tim Holden (Pa.)
Rush Holt (N.J.)
William Jefferson (La.)
Eddie Bernice Johnson (Texas)
Hank Johnson (Ga.)
Ron KindRonald (Ron) James KindCongress must defend role in international trade It's time for Congress to step in and stop Trump's trade abuses Lobbying world MORE (Wis.)
Nick Lampson (Texas)
David Loebsack (Iowa)
Jim MathesonJames (Jim) David MathesonUtah redistricting reform measure likely to qualify for ballot Trump's budget targets affordable, reliable power Work begins on T infrastructure plan MORE (Utah)
Doris Matsui (Calif.)
Jim McDermott (Wash.)
James McGovern (Mass.)
Mike McIntyre (N.C.)
Jerry McNerney (Calif.)
Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump: `A very great moment in the history of the world’ Hillicon Valley: Senate Dems move to force net neutrality vote | AT&T spoke with Mueller's team about Cohen payments | Chinese firm ZTE ceases operations after US ban | Panel advances bills to secure energy infrastructure Lawmakers remember Slaughter in Capitol ceremony MORE (Wis.)
Dennis Moore (Mo.)
Jim Oberstar (Minn.)
Collin Peterson (Minn.)
Charles Rangel (N.Y.)
Bobby Rush (Ill.)
Mike Ross (Ark.)
Linda Sanchez (Calif.)
Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottHouse Dems demand answers from HHS on DOJ's ObamaCare decision Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — DOJ move against ObamaCare sets off frenzy Dems blast DOJ for 'stunning attack on the rule of law' in ObamaCare case MORE (Va.)
Heath Shuler (N.C.)
Hilda Solis (Calif.)
Zack Space (Ohio)
Stephanie Tubbs Jones (Ohio)
Gene Taylor (Miss.)
Mike Thompson (Calif.)
Nydia Velasquez (N.Y.)
Maxine Waters (Calif.)
Mel Watt (N.C.)
Henry Waxman (Calif.)
Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchMerkley leads Dem lawmakers to border amid migrant policy outcry Lawmakers have sights on middlemen blamed for rising drug costs Dem letter calls for rolling back move targeting drug companies MORE (Vt.)