Whip Count: Senate and House budgets

Senate Democratic leaders are looking to minimize defections on their budget, put forward by Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatty MurrayDems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity Live coverage: Senate GOP unveils its ObamaCare repeal bill Senators grill Perry on Yucca nuclear storage plans MORE (D-Wash.).

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In order to pass their first budget resolution in four years, Senate Democrats can only afford five defections — assuming all Republicans vote “no.”

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) has missed budget amendment votes this week due to illness. If he cannot make the final vote, the number of defections that Democrats could afford would drop to four. His office said Friday he is available to vote on the budget if he is needed.

These lists will be updated as members weigh in. Please email information to bcusack@thehill.com.

Last updated at 6:30 p.m. on March 22

Recent updates: Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinSenate Republicans reluctant to rush vote on healthcare bill Manchin: Senate can do 'an awful lot' to improve healthcare bill Sunday shows preview: Senate healthcare debate heats up MORE (D-W.Va.)


SENATE DEMOCRATS

Firm No, Leaning No, Likely No (0)


Undecided, Declined to Answer, No Comment (6)

Max BaucusMax BaucusLawmakers: Leave advertising tax break alone GOP: FBI firing won't slow agenda White House tax-reform push is ‘game changer,’ says ex-chairman MORE (Mont.) — On Friday, the Senate Finance panel chairman said his vote on the budget has "yet to be determined." Baucus is up for reelection in 2014.

Mark BegichMark BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska) — Begich is facing reelection next year.

Joe DonnellyJoe DonnellyLawmakers sport LSU gear at baseball game in honor of Scalise Senate votes to continue arming Saudis As Yemenis suffer the consequences Overnight Defense: Mattis defends Trump budget | Senate rejects effort to block Saudi deal | Boeing to cut 50 executive jobs MORE (Ind.) — Freshman member from a red state.

Kay HaganKay HaganLinking repatriation to job creation Former Sen. Kay Hagan in ICU after being rushed to hospital GOP senator floats retiring over gridlock MORE (N.C.) — Still reviewing as of Friday. Hagan is a GOP target in 2014.

Heidi HeitkampHeidi HeitkampSenate Dem undecided on 2018 reelection run Trump ‘regulatory czar’: Two-for-one rule can work Congress should just say no to more green energy handouts MORE (N.D.) — As of Friday, Heitkamp was still reviewing the budget. Heitkamp is a freshman senator who stresses her independence.

Mark PryorMark PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.) — "We'll see how it looks and how it's amended," Pryor told The Hill on Friday, later adding he has "all day to decide." Skated to reelection in 2008. 2014 may be different.


Yes or leaning yes (8)

Tom HarkinTom HarkinDistance education: Tumultuous today and yesterday Grassley challenger no stranger to defying odds Clinton ally stands between Sanders and chairmanship dream MORE (Iowa) — Retiring liberal senator is leaning "yes."

Tim JohnsonTim JohnsonCourt ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada Bank lobbyists counting down to Shelby’s exit Former GOP senator endorses Clinton after Orlando shooting MORE (S.D.) — Johnson, who is up for reelection, is backing the budget.

Angus KingAngus KingElection hacking fears turn heat on Homeland Security Zinke hits Dems for delaying Interior nominees Angus King: I’m sure Flynn will 'appear before the committee one way or another' MORE (Maine) — This independent who caucus with Democrats will vote "yes."

Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuMeet Mitch Landrieu, the 2020 dark-horse Dem Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Five unanswered questions after Trump's upset victory MORE (La.) — Landrieu will vote "yes." She praised the Murray budget as a strong rebuttal of the House budget, put forward by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul RyanWhy Mariel Cuban criminals deserve amnesty (and Anti-Castro Republicans should support it) GOP agrees on one thing: ObamaCare taxes must go Ryan reminds lawmakers to be on time for votes MORE (R-Wis.), adding, "the Senate and the House will have a very stark choice between the two." Republicans are targeting Landrieu in 2014.

Joe Manchin (W.Va.) — Manchin's vote Thursday night to recommit the budget raised questions about his final vote, but he indicated support on Friday, saying: "We're very open-minded toward it. We need a vehicle."

Claire McCaskillClaire McCaskillSenators question need for HHS cyber office Overnight Cybersecurity: Obama DHS chief defends Russian hack response | Trump huddles on grid security | Lawmakers warned about cyber threat to election systems We must protect our most vulnerable from financial fraudsters MORE (Mo.) — Leaning "yes," saying, "I think it's certainly better than hocus pocus, which is kind of what the Ryan budget is."

Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders tries to sway GOP colleague on Obamacare repeal Sanders draws thousands to rallies against Senate healthcare bill Sanders: FBI's investigation of wife won’t be a ‘distraction’ MORE (Vt.) — An independent who caucuses with Democrats, Sanders said he would support the budget even though he'd prefer higher tax hikes.

Jon TesterJon TesterOvernight Regulation: Labor groups fear rollback of Obama worker protection rule | Trump regs czar advances in Senate | New FCC enforcement chief Trump's 'regulatory czar' advances in Senate Gianforte causes stir after becoming newest House member MORE (Mont.) — Tester told The Hill on March 21 he would be a "yes" vote. 


HOUSE REPUBLICANS

The House on March 21 approved Rep. Paul Ryan's (R-Wis.) budget, with 10 Republicans voting against it.

Here are the 10 no votes:

Justin AmashJustin AmashRepublicans slam Trump’s new policy toward Cuba Kids shouldn't be charged as sex offenders Dem: Disrespect for rule of law by Trump administration 'off the charts' MORE (Mich.) — On March 19, Amash said, "It basically follows the same structure as the previous budget, which I voted 'no' on."

Rep. Paul BrounPaul BrounCalifornia lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner The Trail 2016: Let’s have another debate! MORE (Ga.) — Senate candidate in Georgia. Broun, who has previously backed Ryan budgets, said in a release, "Instead of enacting real spending cuts or taking steps to curb our fiscal irresponsibility, Chairman Ryan's proposal in fact encourages spending growth ... I'm positive that there is indeed a 'Path to Prosperity,' but Chairman Ryan's budget certainly isn't it."

Rep. Rick CrawfordRick CrawfordLawmakers send well-wishes to Scalise on Twitter Moving forward, not back: The U.S.- Cuba relationship How the GOP came to dominate, and be dominated by, rural voters MORE (R-Ark.) — Cites ObamaCare for his no vote.

Rep. Randy ForbesRandy ForbesTrump makes little headway filling out Pentagon jobs Why there's only one choice for Trump's Navy secretary Trump likely to tap business executive to head Navy: report MORE (R-Va.) — Forbes voted no because he believes "it fails to fund our military at an adequate level to provide for the common defense of our nation."

Chris Gibson (N.Y.) — Gibson is considered vulnerable next year. Voted against last year’s budget, saying defense spending must be reduced.

Phil GingreyPhil GingreyBeating the drum on healthcare Former GOP chairman joins K Street Former Rep. Gingrey lands on K Street MORE (Ga.) — A possible Senate candidate in Georgia, Gingrey had been seen as a possible "yes" vote. Before the vote, he said: "I support conservative principles that spur job growth."

Joe Heck (Nev.) — Democrats highlighted Heck's support of the Ryan budget in the 2012 election. In a release, Heck suggested Ryan plan is anti-Nevada: "...when those proposals disproportionately affect our state, my vote indicates my priority and that priority is Nevada."

Rep. Walter Jones (N.C.) — Citing foreign aid, Jones said he would vote "no." Jones rejected Ryan's budgets in the last Congress.

Thomas Massie (Ky.) — In a release, Massie stated, "Paul Ryan's proposed House budget would increase government spending at nearly twice the rate of inflation. Our country is deep in debt, and it is irresponsible to increase spending at this rate."

David McKinleyDavid McKinleyDems plot recess offensive on ObamaCare Overnight Energy: Democrats take on key Trump Interior nominee Manchin gets a GOP challenger MORE (W.Va.) — Cited a variety of reasons why he voted no, including cuts to the budget of the FBI and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which have offices in West Virginia. McKinely rejected Ryan budgets in 2011 and 2012.


— Noura Alfadi-Andreasson, Bernie Becker, Russell Berman, Bob Cusack, Zach DeRitis, Molly K. Hooper, Amrita Khalid, Alex Lazar, Taylor Seale, Mario Trujillo and Erik Wasson contributed.