Whip Count: Senate and House budgets

Senate Democratic leaders are looking to minimize defections on their budget, put forward by Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty MurrayPatty MurrayWhat the 'Bernie Sanders wing of the GOP' can teach Congress Senate Dems demand answers from Wells Fargo over treatment of military A fight for new rights MORE (D-Wash.).

In order to pass their first budget resolution in four years, Senate Democrats can only afford five defections — assuming all Republicans vote “no.”

Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.) has missed budget amendment votes this week due to illness. If he cannot make the final vote, the number of defections that Democrats could afford would drop to four. His office said Friday he is available to vote on the budget if he is needed.

These lists will be updated as members weigh in. Please email information to bcusack@thehill.com.

Last updated at 6:30 p.m. on March 22

Recent updates: Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinTrump questions hound endangered Republican Dems to McConnell: Pass 'clean' extension of Iran sanctions Convicted ex-coal boss says he’s a ‘political prisoner’ MORE (D-W.Va.)


Firm No, Leaning No, Likely No (0)

Undecided, Declined to Answer, No Comment (6)

Max BaucusMax BaucusChina moves to lift ban on US beef Overnight Healthcare: Zika fight stalls government funding talks | Census finds big drop in uninsured | Mental health bill faces wait Glover Park Group now lobbying for Lyft MORE (Mont.) — On Friday, the Senate Finance panel chairman said his vote on the budget has "yet to be determined." Baucus is up for reelection in 2014.

Mark BegichMark BegichTrump campaign left out of Alaska voter guide Ryan's victory trumps justice reform opponents There is great responsibility being in the minority MORE (Alaska) — Begich is facing reelection next year.

Joe DonnellyJoe DonnellyGreat Lakes senators seek boost for maritime system Liberal groups urge Schumer to reject Bayh for Banking gavel A dozen senators call for crackdown on Chinese steel MORE (Ind.) — Freshman member from a red state.

Kay HaganKay HaganPhoto finish predicted for Trump, Clinton in North Carolina Are Senate Republicans facing an election wipeout? Clinton's lead in NC elevates Senate race MORE (N.C.) — Still reviewing as of Friday. Hagan is a GOP target in 2014.

Heidi HeitkampHeidi HeitkampMoney for nothing: Rethinking CO2 Liberal groups urge Schumer to reject Bayh for Banking gavel Court ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada MORE (N.D.) — As of Friday, Heitkamp was still reviewing the budget. Heitkamp is a freshman senator who stresses her independence.

Mark PryorMark PryorCotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Top Democrats are no advocates for DC statehood MORE (Ark.) — "We'll see how it looks and how it's amended," Pryor told The Hill on Friday, later adding he has "all day to decide." Skated to reelection in 2008. 2014 may be different.

Yes or leaning yes (8)

Tom HarkinTom HarkinGrassley challenger no stranger to defying odds Clinton ally stands between Sanders and chairmanship dream Do candidates care about our health or just how much it costs? MORE (Iowa) — Retiring liberal senator is leaning "yes."

Tim JohnsonTim JohnsonCourt ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada Bank lobbyists counting down to Shelby’s exit Former GOP senator endorses Clinton after Orlando shooting MORE (S.D.) — Johnson, who is up for reelection, is backing the budget.

Angus KingAngus KingBetter child care for stronger families Wells CEO Stumpf resigns from Fed advisory panel Pentagon chief: 9/11 bill could be used against US troops MORE (Maine) — This independent who caucus with Democrats will vote "yes."

Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuTrump’s implosion could cost GOP in Louisiana Senate race Louisiana needs Caroline Fayard as its new senator La. Senate contender books seven-figure ad buy MORE (La.) — Landrieu will vote "yes." She praised the Murray budget as a strong rebuttal of the House budget, put forward by House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul RyanRNC chairman: Ryan one of 'brightest stars' in Republican Party Gingrich: 'Of course' we can afford to have president with split personality Could a President Clinton heal a divided nation? MORE (R-Wis.), adding, "the Senate and the House will have a very stark choice between the two." Republicans are targeting Landrieu in 2014.

Joe Manchin (W.Va.) — Manchin's vote Thursday night to recommit the budget raised questions about his final vote, but he indicated support on Friday, saying: "We're very open-minded toward it. We need a vehicle."

Claire McCaskillClaire McCaskillMcCaskill offers Trump 'Mean Girls' advice Trump's taxes bump Miss Universe from headlines Dem on NYT report: Trump 'walks away with a golden ticket' MORE (Mo.) — Leaning "yes," saying, "I think it's certainly better than hocus pocus, which is kind of what the Ryan budget is."

Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump: Podesta a 'nasty guy' Sanders’ brother loses British parliamentary election America’s Eastern European mess MORE (Vt.) — An independent who caucuses with Democrats, Sanders said he would support the budget even though he'd prefer higher tax hikes.

Jon TesterJon TesterGOP plan: Link Dems to an email scandal Court ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada Election-year politics: Senate Dems shun GOP vulnerables MORE (Mont.) — Tester told The Hill on March 21 he would be a "yes" vote. 


The House on March 21 approved Rep. Paul Ryan's (R-Wis.) budget, with 10 Republicans voting against it.

Here are the 10 no votes:

Justin AmashJustin AmashLawmakers press Lynch for briefing on Yahoo secret email scanning reports House Freedom Caucus member slows floor business House votes to block Gitmo transfers MORE (Mich.) — On March 19, Amash said, "It basically follows the same structure as the previous budget, which I voted 'no' on."

Rep. Paul BrounPaul BrounCalifornia lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner The Trail 2016: Let’s have another debate! MORE (Ga.) — Senate candidate in Georgia. Broun, who has previously backed Ryan budgets, said in a release, "Instead of enacting real spending cuts or taking steps to curb our fiscal irresponsibility, Chairman Ryan's proposal in fact encourages spending growth ... I'm positive that there is indeed a 'Path to Prosperity,' but Chairman Ryan's budget certainly isn't it."

Rep. Rick CrawfordRick CrawfordWhy a bill about catfish will show whether Ryan's serious about regulatory reform Convention calendar: Parties and events Southern lawmakers fight to keep USDA catfish inspections MORE (R-Ark.) — Cites ObamaCare for his no vote.

Rep. Randy ForbesRandy Forbes78 lawmakers vote to sustain Obama veto Insiders dominate year of the outsider Corrine Brown loses primary amid indictment MORE (R-Va.) — Forbes voted no because he believes "it fails to fund our military at an adequate level to provide for the common defense of our nation."

Chris Gibson (N.Y.) — Gibson is considered vulnerable next year. Voted against last year’s budget, saying defense spending must be reduced.

Phil GingreyPhil GingreyBeating the drum on healthcare Former GOP chairman joins K Street Former Rep. Gingrey lands on K Street MORE (Ga.) — A possible Senate candidate in Georgia, Gingrey had been seen as a possible "yes" vote. Before the vote, he said: "I support conservative principles that spur job growth."

Joe Heck (Nev.) — Democrats highlighted Heck's support of the Ryan budget in the 2012 election. In a release, Heck suggested Ryan plan is anti-Nevada: "...when those proposals disproportionately affect our state, my vote indicates my priority and that priority is Nevada."

Rep. Walter Jones (N.C.) — Citing foreign aid, Jones said he would vote "no." Jones rejected Ryan's budgets in the last Congress.

Thomas Massie (Ky.) — In a release, Massie stated, "Paul Ryan's proposed House budget would increase government spending at nearly twice the rate of inflation. Our country is deep in debt, and it is irresponsible to increase spending at this rate."

David McKinleyDavid McKinleyEthics panel scolds GOP lawmaker over namesake firm Lawmakers press concerns over fuel efficiency rules Senate panel approves pension rescue for coal miners MORE (W.Va.) — Cited a variety of reasons why he voted no, including cuts to the budget of the FBI and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which have offices in West Virginia. McKinely rejected Ryan budgets in 2011 and 2012.

— Noura Alfadi-Andreasson, Bernie Becker, Russell Berman, Bob Cusack, Zach DeRitis, Molly K. Hooper, Amrita Khalid, Alex Lazar, Taylor Seale, Mario Trujillo and Erik Wasson contributed.