The Hill's Whip List: 19 GOP no votes on new ObamaCare replacement bill

House Republicans have an updated bill to repeal and replace ObamaCare, and The Hill has a new whip list.

The updated bill includes an amendment from Reps. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and Tom MacArthur (R-N.J.) that would allow states to opt out of key ObamaCare rules, including on minimum coverage requirements and allowing insurers to charge more based on individuals' health.

Those changes were designed to win over conservatives, and the new legislation has been backed by the House Freedom Caucus and outside groups including the Club for Growth and FreedomWorks.

Centrists, though, expressed concerns over preexisting conditions.

On Wednesday, Rep. Fred Upton drafted a new amendment that would provide $8 billion over five years to help people with preexisting conditions pay for premiums in states that seek waivers.

The question is whether that is enough to bring centrists on board.

A mix of centrists and conservatives objected to the earlier ObamaCare bill, forcing GOP leaders to call off a planned vote.

No Democrats are expected to vote for the measure, and one Republican, Rep. Dan Newhouse (Wash.), will miss the vote, meaning GOP leaders can only afford 21 defections.

Below is a list of where key Republicans stand based on the new bill.

The list will be continually updated. Please send updates to mmali@thehill.com

This list was last updated on May 4 at 2:06 p.m.

Recent updates: Reps. Will Hurd (Texas), Dave ReichertDavid ReichertJuan Williams: Momentum builds against gerrymandering GOP worries as state Dems outperform in special elections Targeted Republicans push back on retirement speculation MORE (Wash.), Mike Coffman (Colo.), Elise Stefanik (N.Y.), Jeff Denham (Calif.), Erik Paulsen (Minn.), John Faso (N.Y.), Gus Bilirakis (Fla.), Steve King (Iowa), David McKinleyDavid McKinleyThere’s a way to protect consumers and keep good call center jobs in the U.S. The myth of OTC hearing aids The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (W.Va.), Brian Mast (Fla.), Mark AmodeiMark Eugene AmodeiOvernight Finance: House passes .2T funding package for 2018 | FTC launches Equifax probe | Mnuchin defends honeymoon jet request | House scraps measure to boost credit union regulator oversight Trump’s EPA budget cuts hit strong opposition at House panel MORE (Nev.), David Young (Iowa), Ted Budd (N.C.), Daniel Webster (Fla.), Darin LaHood (Ill.), John Faso (N.Y.), Barbara Comstock (Va.), Dan Donovan (N.Y.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Herrera BeutlerWorking together on children’s healthcare The Hill's Latina Leaders to Watch CNN launches new digital series on 'badass women of Washington' MORE (Wash.), Frank LoBiondo, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.), Carlos Curbelo (Fla.), Fred Upton (Mich.), Billy Long (Mo.), Steve Chabot (Ohio), Chris Collins (N.Y.) Don YoungDon YoungHouse Republican causes stir claiming female lawmaker 'doesn’t know a damn thing' Alaska lobbies for defense boost after North Korea launch Puerto Rico statehood bid a total failure MORE (Alaska), Paul GosarPaul GosarHouse votes to block funding for EPA methane pollution rule McCain needs to start showing my constituents more respect Fresh Freedom Caucus demands stall GOP budget MORE (Ariz.), Brad Wenstrup (Ohio), Andy Harris (Md.), Rodney Davis (Ill.), Louie GohmertLouie GohmertHow Republicans split on the Harvey aid, fiscal deal House passes Trump deal on majority Democratic vote Lawmakers press DOJ to help victims of Ponzi scheme MORE (Texas), Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney FrelinghuysenNJ House candidate takes dig at Trump's Charlottesville response in campaign ad House passes .2T government funding package for 2018 House approves Harvey aid as debt wrangling begins MORE (N.J.), Kevin YoderKevin YoderHow Republicans split on the Harvey aid, fiscal deal House GOP group puts staff in six new districts Progressive group running ads opposing tax cuts for the wealthy MORE (Kan.), and David Valadao (Calif.).

 

NO (19)

Rep. Andy Biggs (Ariz.) — “The MacArthur amendment is an effort to make the AHCA better, but it does not meet my constituents’ threshold for repeal,” the Freedom Caucus member said. Biggs was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Mike Coffman (Colo.) — “At this time, I cannot support the AHCA with the MacArthur amendment because I’m concerned that a small percentage of those with preexisting conditions may still not be protected,” he said in a statement. “Also, as I have stated in the past, I’m certainly not going to vote on a bill of this magnitude that hasn’t been fully scored by the Congressional Budget Office and whose estimated price tag is unknown.”

Rep. Barbara Comstock (Va.) — The centrist Republican told The Hill she is still a no after the Upton Amendment. Comstock is one of Democrats' top targets in 2018.

Rep. Ryan Costello (Pa.) — Costello told reporters Thursday he was a no.

Rep. Charlie Dent (Pa.) — The co-chairman of the centrist Tuesday Group is still a no.

Rep. Dan Donovan (N.Y.) — The freshman lawmaker told The Hill he still plans to vote no after the Upton Amendment.

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.) — A centrist, Fitzpatrick is still a no.

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (Wash.) — Herrera Beutler, a member of the Tuesday Group, is still a no after the Upton Amendment.

Rep. Will Hurd (Texas) — “I will not support the AHCA in its current form and hope that we can continue making improvements that fix our broken healthcare system,” Hurd said in a statement.

Rep. Walter Jones (N.C.) — Jones, who has bucked GOP leaders on a number of occasions, is still a no.

Rep. John Katko (N.Y.) — Katko is still a no. "To me, it doesn't move the needle enough," he told Syracuse.com. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden slams Trump over golf gif hitting Clinton Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax hit by earlier hack | What to know about Kaspersky controversy | Officials review EU-US privacy pact Overnight Tech: Equifax hit by earlier undisclosed hack | Facebook takes heat over Russian ads | Alt-right Twitter rival may lose domain MORE won Katko's district in November.

Rep. Leonard Lance (N.J.) — Lance is still a no.

Rep. Frank LoBiondo (N.J.) — LoBiondo is still voting no despite the changes.

Rep. Thomas Massie (Ky.) — Massie, a conservative who is not in the Freedom Caucus, said he is still a no.

Rep. Patrick Meehan (Pa.) — Meehan said the revised bill would raise premiums for those with pre-existing conditions and older Americans.

Rep. Dave Reichert (Wash.) — "This bill, although a good attempt, falls short," he reportedly told a Seattle TV station.

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.) — The centrist Republican from south Florida said she is a no even with the Upton Amendment. Clinton won Ros-Lehtinen's district by nearly 20 points in 2016, but the longtime GOP lawmaker said she will not seek reelection in 2018.

Rep. Chris Smith (N.J.) — Smith told ABC he is still a no. The New Jersey lawmaker is meeting with leaders Thursday.

Rep. Michael Turner (Ohio) — Turner on Thursday told CNN he is still a no.

 

UNDECIDED/UNCLEAR (46)

Rep. Justin Amash (Mich.) — The Freedom Caucus member told reporters Thursday morning he is still reviewing the changes. He was a no in March.

Rep. Brian Babin (Texas) — The Texas lawmaker, a former member of the Freedom Caucus, was yes on the first bill.

Rep. Rob Bishop (Utah) — Bishop was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Rod Blum (Iowa) — Freedom Caucus member was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Paul Cook (Calif.)  Cook was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Rick Crawford (Ark.) — Crawford was a no on the first bill.

Rep. John Culberson (Texas)  Culberson was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Carlos Curbelo (Fla.) — Curbelo said he was still undecided on Thursday morning. He said leaders made "compelling points" after a meeting.

Rep. Warren Davidson (Ohio) ­— Davidson was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Jeff Denham (Calif.) — Denham previously The Hill he was a no. The lawmaker, though, also sponsored the Upton amendment on Wednesday.

Rep. Ron DeSantis (Fla.) — DeSantis was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (Fla.) — A centrist, Diaz-Balart voted to advance the first bill in the House Budget Committee but said he had "serious concerns."

Rep. Jeff Duncan (S.C.) — Duncan, a Freedom Caucus member, was a lean no on the first bill.

Rep. Neal Dunn (Fla.) — Dunn was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Tom Emmer (Minn.) — Emmer was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Ron Estes (Kan.) — Sworn in last week, Estes says he needs to review the changes.

Rep. Jeff Fortenberry (Neb.)

Rep. Trent Franks (Ariz.)  The Freedom Caucus member was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen (N.J.) — The chairman of the Appropriations Committee was a no on the first bill. He told The Hill on May 1 he is "still looking" at the changes. "My position is that I'm focused on the appropriations process, trying to get the bill across the finish line. I haven't been focused on anything else."

Rep. Tom Garrett (Va.) — Garrett was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Duncan Hunter (Calif.)  — Hunter was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Darrell Issa (Calif.) — Issa initially declined to share his position on Wednesday, before telling a reporter for a San Diego ABC affiliate that he's "undecided and still reviewing the changes to the bill.”

Rep. Mike Johnson (La.) — Johnson was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. David Joyce (Ohio) — Joyce, formerly a no, said Tuesday he is undecided.

Rep. Trent Kelly (Miss.) — Kelly was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Pete King (N.Y.) — King was leaning no on the first bill.

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (Ill.) — Kinzinger is undecided. He was a yes on the earlier bill.

Rep. Steve Knight (Calif.) — Knight was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. David Kustoff (Tenn.) — Kustoff was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Raúl Labrador (Idaho) — The Freedom Caucus member was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Darin LaHood (R-Ill.) — LaHood is undecided on the bill. 

Rep. Doug LaMalfa (Calif.) — LaMalfa was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Mia Love (Utah)  Love was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Michael McCaul (Texas) — McCaul was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Steve Pearce (N.M.) — Pearce was a lean no on the first bill.

Rep. Scott Perry (Pa.) — Perry was a lean no on the first bill.

Rep. Bruce Poliquin (Maine) — Poliquin, a centrist, was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Ted Poe (Texas) — Poe was a yes on the first bill.

Rep. Bill Posey (Fla.) — Posey was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Ed Royce (Calif.) — The House Foreign Affairs chairman is undecided and has serious concerns with the revised bill, a spokesperson told The Hill.

Rep. Glenn Thompson (Pa.) — Thompson was a no on the first bill.

Rep. David Valadao (Calif.)  Valadao is still undecided.

Rep. Randy Weber (Texas) — The Freedom Caucus member was undecided on the first bill.

Rep. Rob Wittman (Va.) — Wittman was a no on the first bill.

Rep. Kevin Yoder (Kan.) — Yoder is undecided on the revised bill.

Rep. Don Young (Alaska) — Young was a lean no on the first bill. He said he is undecided on the new bill.

 

YES/LEAN YES (35)

Rep. Ralph Abraham (La.) — Abraham also backed the first bill.

Rep. Mark Amodei (Nev.) — Amodei has been no for awhile, but told Matt Fuller of The Huffington Post on Thursday, hours before a possible vote, that he was a yes.

Rep. Gus Bilirakis (Fla.) — Bilirakis told The Hill he is a yes.

Rep. Dave Brat (Va.) — The Freedom Caucus member is now a yes.

Rep. Mo Brooks (Ala.)  — The Freedom Caucus member was a no, but is now supports the revised bill.

Rep. Ken Buck (Colo.)  Buck is still a yes on the new bill.

Rep. Ted Budd (N.C.) — In a late Wednesday statement, Budd said he's "proud to support the American Health Care Act," saying Thursday's vote "marks the beginning of the end of Obamacare as we know it." 

Rep. Steve Chabot (Ohio) — The chairman of the House Small Business Committee told The Hill he is a yes.

Rep. Chris Collins (N.Y.) — Collins, an early Trump supporter, is a yes.

Rep. Rodney Davis (Ill.) — GOP Whip Team member tells The Hill he will vote for the new bill.

Rep. Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.) — The Freedom Caucus member says he'll support the bill now with the changes. He was a no in March.

Rep. John Faso (N.Y.)  Faso said he is a yes on Thursday morning. “After careful review of the changes to the American Health Care Act, I believe that this legislation addresses my concerns and I will support the AHCA as amended.”

Rep. Louie Gohmert (Texas) — The Freedom Caucus member was a no on the first bill but is backing the revised legislation.

Rep. Paul Gosar (Ariz.)  Gosar was undecided on the first bill but is now voting yes.

Rep. Andy Harris (Md.) — The Freedom Caucus member was a no on the first bill, but told The Hill he is now voting yes.

Rep. Jody Hice (Ga.) — Hice, a Freedom Caucus member, is a yes on the revised bill. In a statement, he said he supported the bill, but added, "the battle for a full repeal is not over."

Rep. Jim Jordan (Ohio) — Jordan, a former chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, is now a yes. "It is our best chance to pass a bill through the House that will actually reduce the cost of health insurance for everyday Americans," he said Wednesday.

Rep. Steve King (Iowa) — King told ABC he is a yes. King had been undecided before the Upton Amendment.

Rep. Billy Long (Mo.) — Long, who was opposed, is now supporting the bill after an amendment from Rep. Fred Upton on preexisting conditions.

Rep. Tom MacArthur (N.J.) — The leader of the centrist Tuesday Group negotiated the changes to the bill.

Rep. Brian Mast (Fla.) — Mast is a yes.

Rep. David McKinley (W.Va.) — McKinley is voting yes, according to NBC News.

Rep. Mark Meadows (N.C.) — The leader of the House Freedom Caucus negotiated the changes with MacArthur.

Rep. Erik Paulsen (Minn.) — Paulsen's office said he is a yes.

Rep. Tom Reed (N.Y.) — Reed is now a lean yes. He voted the first bill out of the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Calif.) — Rohrabacher was undecided on the first bill, but says he'll back the amended legislation. Says he is "inclined to support our leadership."

Rep. Mark Sanford (S.C.) — Sanford, a member of the Freedom Caucus, flipped to yes from no after the changes.

Rep. Elise Stefanik (N.Y.) — A member of the Tuesday Group, Stefanik is a yes. “The American Health Care Act is not perfect, but it is an important step in reforming our broken healthcare system to help families in our district. As this legislation moves to the Senate, I will continue to work to strengthen the support for those with pre-existing conditions,” Stefanik said in a statement, according to the Times Union.

Rep. Fred Upton (Mich.) — The former Energy and Commerce chairman is supporting the bill after drafting an amendment to address concerns over preexisting conditions. Upton, who previously opposed the bill, announced the change after a meeting Wednesday with President Trump.

Rep. Jackie Walorski (Ind.) — GOP Whip team member is a "yes."

Rep. Mimi Walters (Calif.) — Walters told the Los Angeles Times she is still a yes.

Rep. Daniel Webster (Fla.) — Webster told The Hill he is now a yes on Wednesday night.

Rep. Brad Wenstrup (Ohio) — Wenstrup was undecided on the first bill but told The Hill he is now a yes.

Rep. Ted Yoho (Fla.)  Yoho, a Freedom Caucus member, told Fox News he is a "yes, under duress." Yoho was a no on the first bill.

Rep. David Young (Iowa) — Young is a co-sponsor of the Upton amendment and appears to be moving closer to voting yes on the bill. In a statement, he said the need for action is highlighted by news that the insurer Medica is leaving his state. "This amendment reinforces my commitment to ensuring coverage for Iowans with pre-existing conditions; it will help make healthcare coverage less expensive than under current law — the Affordable Care Act — and accessible for patients who need it most.”