Cards Against Humanity buying plot of land on border to try to stop Trump's wall

The company that makes Cards Against Humanity is trying to prevent President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he doesn't want to use 'adversary' to describe Russia Comey urges Americans to vote for Democrats in midterms Roby wins Alabama GOP runoff, overcoming blowback from Trump criticism MORE's proposed border wall from being built by purchasing a plot of vacant land along the country's border.

"Donald Trump is a preposterous golem who is afraid of Mexicans. He is so afraid that he wants to build a twenty-billion dollar wall that everyone knows will accomplish nothing," a statement said on the website Cards Against Humanity Saves America.

"So we’ve purchased a plot of vacant land on the border and retained a law firm specializing in eminent domain to make it as time-consuming and expensive as possible for the wall to get built."

ADVERTISEMENT
The effort is part of a holiday promotion that encourages the game's users to send in $15 in exchange for "six America-saving surprises."

The promotion, which is now sold out, promises to send Cards Against Humanity Saves America recipients an "illustrated map of the land" and "a certificate of our promise to fight the wall," among other "surprises."

The company says it is trying to save America from "injustice, lies, racism, the whole enchilada."

In a video posted on the website, a narrator said the country "seemed to be hanging from a thread" after Trump's election

"But then, the small card game company from Chicago, Illinois, known as Cards Against Humanity, launched a bold campaign to save America," the narrator said.

"These scrappy comedy writers would come to be hailed as saviors by the American people. They stopped Trump's border wall."

Trump made building a wall along the country's southern border one of his key promises during his presidential campaign.

Last month, The Associated Press reported that eight prototypes for Trump's proposed border wall would soon undergo tests to determine how well they stand up to breach attempts.