Pro-marijuana legalization group selling rolling papers with Sessions's face

Pro-marijuana legalization group selling rolling papers with Sessions's face
© Screenshot from

A group advocating for the legalization of recreational marijuana use is now selling rolling paper with the attorney general's face on the box.

The group, called #JeffSesh, says on its website that it is a campaign to tell Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMcCabe defends himself against firing in Washington Post op-ed Attorney: Roy Moore supporters offered K, Bannon meeting to drop accuser as client Al Franken: Sessions firing McCabe ‘is hypocrisy at its worst’ MORE:  "We’re not criminals, junkies or idiots. Regular Jeffs all over the country — good, responsible, patriotic Americans — have a sesh now and then… and it's OK!"

"Every time you sesh with any brand of JeffSesh papers, you’re helping keep the law moving forward — and not back to the Nixon era," the website says. "You’re saying we’ve moved on, Jeff."


The website sells two versions of the rolling papers, a black box and a white box, which both display Sessions's face with a joint in his mouth. The rolling paper sells for $5 a box and is also available on Etsy.

The group appears to be relatively new online, having only joined Twitter and Instagram early this year. It does not specify whether the money raised by the rolling paper goes toward any specific marijuana advocacy groups. 

The Hill has reached out to #JeffSesh for comment.

Sessions has long opposed the legalization of marijuana, but has come under fire over the stance in recent days after he announced the rollback of an Obama-era policy that gave states the leeway to allow recreational use of the drug.

"Previous nationwide guidance specific to marijuana enforcement is unnecessary and is rescinded, effective immediately," a January memo by Sessions reads.

The memo was met with backlash from both Republicans and Democrats alike. 

In May of last year, the attorney general also sent a letter to congressional leaders asking them to get rid of an amendment in the department's budget that blocks the Justice Department from using federal money to prevent states "from implementing their own State laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession or cultivation of medical marijuana."

Using marijuana for recreational purposes is legal in six states — Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Alaska, Nevada and California — plus the District of Columbia. Massachusetts and Maine are set to legalize marijuana later this year.