GOP flacks' ballot choice: Ricky Bobby or Jack Bauer

Republicans might not be the majority party, but that doesn’t mean they don’t know how to party. The Republican Communications Association, a group of GOP press and communications folks, is electing its executive committee this week, including the contested position of social director, the guy or gal in charge of setting up gatherings for a notably party-happy crowd.

Republicans might not be the majority party, but that doesn’t mean they don’t know how to party. The Republican Communications Association, a group of GOP press and communications folks, is electing its executive committee this week, including the contested position of social director, the guy or gal in charge of setting up gatherings for a notably party-happy crowd.

We got a peek at the pitches each of the candidates made to the group, and although most of them were pretty buttoned-up, a few stand out for invoking some heavyweight pop-culture icons.

Brad Dayspring, who was just appointed communications director for the Republican Study Committee, claimed an endorsement by Jack Bauer, the badass lead character of the Fox action series “24.” “Remember, Jack Bauer never retreats, he just attacks in the opposite direction,” Dayspring reminds the group in his spiel. He also notes that he lost last year, despite being endorsed by Chuck Norris.

Our favorite pitch, though, came from Greg Keeley, communications director for Rep. Ed Royce of California.  Quoting heavily from the cult comedy “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby,” Keeley promises good times ahead. “You don’t want wusses like Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman running your social calendar,” he tells the committee members. And here’s a campaign promise we can’t resist: “I’m all jacked up on Mountain Dew and if elected, I’m gonna come at the job like a spider monkey,” Keeley wrote.

Other entries, while more sedate, provide a window into life as a GOP staffer these days. Education and Labor committee spokeswoman Lindsay Mask, who is running to head up the group’s professional-development efforts, vowed to offer “more opportunities for members to meet with private companies and learn more about transitioning from life on the Hill to life in a firm.”

Um, what revolving door?


 
Rep. Shuler’s office guarded by fluffy and cuddly puppy

Rep. Heath Shuler (D-N.C.) has only been in Congress for a few weeks, but already, his office is going to the dogs. Shuler, a former NFL player, raises and trains Labrador retrievers. And his fondness for man’s best friend means he’s running a dog-friendly office.

Which is a good thing for Reese, the 8-week-old English bulldog who has been accompanying his new owner, Shuler legislative assistant Rob Ellsworth, to work. Too-cute Reese, who was named after the candy treat, has been attracting legions of admirers since he arrived in Shuler’s Cannon office this week.

Reese spends some time in a doggie crate, Shuler spokesman Andrew Whalen said, and Ellsworth takes him for frequent walks outside.

Mostly, though, Reese is napping on the job. “He sleeps a lot,” Whalen said.

Shuler apparently likes having a dogged staff: Both of his campaign offices hosted four-legged friends, one of which Shuler had given to a staffer. And although his Washington office boasts a painting of Labs, Shuler’s own pups are back at home in Waynesville, N.C.

Reese is still in good company, though, joining some other Capitol Hill dogs whose popularity has threatened to eclipse that of their bosses, including Charlotte, the friendly spaniel belonging to Majority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) and Sen. Edward Kennedy’s  (D-Mass.) rambunctious Portuguese water dogs, Splash and Sunny.


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