TRENDING:

SPONSORED:

Facing uphill climb, DREAM Act supporters target Senate's 'Most Wanted'

Advocates for legislation providing illegal-immigrant students a way to remain in the country lawfully launched a last-minute effort this week to rally centrist senators behind the bill.

The National Hispanic Leadership Agenda (NHLA) released a "most wanted" list on Tuesday targeting 10 Senate lawmakers — three Democrats and seven Republicans — in hopes of getting the DREAM Act over the finish line before the 111th Congress adjourns.

ADVERTISEMENT
"We don't want them to be able to hide behind closed doors," NHLA Chairwoman Lillian Rodríguez-López said by telephone. "We need them to let us know where they stand."

NHLA is targeting Democratic Sens. Ben Nelson (Neb.), Kay HaganKay HaganGOP senator floats retiring over gridlock 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map The untold stories of the 2016 battle for the Senate MORE (N.C.) and Claire McCaskillClaire McCaskillMesser eyes challenging Donnelly for Indiana Senate seat Overnight Defense: Funding bill would ease Trump Defense pick's confirmation | Obama delivers final security speech Congress wants hearing on Pentagon wasteful spending charges MORE (Mo), and Republican Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamOvernight Cybersecurity: Retired general picked to head DHS | Graham vows to probe Russian election interference Overnight Tech: AT&T, Time Warner CEOs defend merger before Congress | More tech execs join Trump team | Republican details path to undoing net neutrality Overnight Finance: Trump blasts Carrier's union leader | What's in the spending bill | Jamie Dimon gets perch for Trump era | AT&T, Time Warner execs grilled MORE (S.C.), Dick Lugar (Ind.), Olympia Snowe (Maine), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsDems, greens gear up for fight against Trump EPA pick Medicare looms over Trump-Ryan alliance Senators crafting bill to limit deportations under Trump MORE (Maine), Scott Brown (Mass.), George Voinovich (Ohio) and George LeMieux (Fla.).

The lawmakers have been singled out either because they've supported the DREAM Act in the past, or because the states they represent have significant Hispanic populations.

DREAM Act proponents have a tough road ahead. Although the bill passed the House last week, it faces a much steeper climb in the Senate, where a GOP filibuster will require at least 60 votes to send the bill to President Obama, who supports it.

The Senate passed the DREAM Act as part of comprehensive immigration reform in 2006, but a stand-alone measure considered a year later fell eight votes shy of the 60 needed to move forward.

At least four of the 10 senators on NHLA's list say they'll oppose the bill if it comes up in the lame-duck.

Nelson spokesman Jake Thompson, for instance, said the Nebraska Democrat — who voted in favor of the bill in 2007 — now opposes any major immigration reform until the U.S. border is secure.

Hagan's office, meanwhile, said the DREAM Act shouldn't be considered as a stand-alone bill.

“Senator Hagan is committed to achieving practical, bipartisan, comprehensive immigration reform that will secure our borders, hold employers accountable for their hiring practices, and strengthen our guest worker system," spokeswoman Sadie Weiner said in an e-mail. "Senator Hagan believes the DREAM Act should be considered in the context of comprehensive immigration reform.”

Brown on Monday told The Boston Globe the bill creates "a backdoor amnesty" for illegal aliens — "I'm not supportive of it," he said.

Graham — who supported the proposal in both 2006 and 2007 — issued a statement after Thursday's House vote announcing his current opposition.

“Illegal immigration is a nightmare for America," Graham said. "Giving a pathway to citizenship without first securing the border is an inducement to encourage more illegal immigration."

McCaskill, who voted against the DREAM Act in 2007, remains undecided, according to spokeswoman Laura Myron.

Of the 10 lawmakers being targeted by NHLA, only one has announced his support. Lugar spokesman Mark Helmke said Friday that the Indiana Republican — a leading sponsor of past versions of the bill — will vote for the proposal if it comes up as a stand-alone. Republican Sen. Bob Bennett (Utah) has made similar statements.
 
The offices of the other four senators did not respond to requests for comment.

Sponsored by Rep. Howard Berman (D-Calif) and Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinReid defends relationship with McConnell in farewell speech Depleted Dems look to Senate for 2020 nominee Dem senator threatens to slow-walk spending bill MORE (D-Ill.), the nine-year-old DREAM Act would create a pathway to permanent residency — and, eventually, citizenship — for illegal immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, have the equivalent of a high school degree, and enter college or the military.

Supporters argue it offers motivated children the opportunity to achieve their potential toward the betterment of the country; critics maintain it would reward law-breakers and steal jobs from U.S. citizens. 

The Senate is expected to take up the DREAM Act either this week or next.