Deal likely to sail through Senate

Senate leaders expect a bipartisan budget deal reached late last week to easily pass the upper chamber Thursday afternoon.
 
Democrats are by-and-large happy the spending agreement does not cut the Head Start early education program or slash Pell Grants — although it would eliminate summer Pell Grants.
 

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Sen. Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinDem Senator open to bid from the left in 2020 Senate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Trump should require federal contractors to follow the law MORE (D-Iowa), who has jurisdiction over health and education programs, said he would vote for the deal.
 
“We have no reduction in Pell Grants and we kept a lot of our other priorities in there. There will be no reductions in Head Start,” he said, noting that the summer grants would be eliminated, something President Obama proposed in his budget plan.
 
Some Democrats, including Sens. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Judge rules Trump can't block Twitter users | ISIS content finds a home on Google Plus | Rubio rips ZTE demands as 'terrible deal' | Bill would protect kids' data Wyden presses FBI for information on inflated encryption figures Senate Finance Committee releases 22 opioid bills to mark up in ‘coming weeks’ MORE (D-Ore.) and Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownTrump on collision course with Congress on ZTE Pa. health secretary: 'Sustainable funding' needed to attack opioid crisis The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — How long can a Trump-DOJ accord survive? MORE (D-Ohio), have concerns over the legislation, but the opposition within the Democratic Caucus is not strong.
 
“It’s not significant,” Senate Democratic Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinHouse easily passes prison reform bill backed by Trump This week: House GOP regroups after farm bill failure Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Trump hits federally funded clinics with new abortion restrictions MORE (D-Ill.) said when asked about the number of potential defections. “We have a number of senators we’re still talking to.”
 
A senior Senate GOP aide predicted that five to 10 conservative lawmakers might vote against the deal, including Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulOvernight Energy: Reporters barred from Day 2 of EPA summit | Dems blame Trump for gas price increases | Massachusetts to get new offshore wind farm Senate Democrats look for traction on gas prices GOP Senate primary heats up in Montana MORE (R-Ky.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeDenial of services to same-sex couples can harm their health GOP Senate primary heats up in Montana Senate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA MORE (R-Utah) and Jim DeMint (R-S.C.).
 
The aide said the compromise would have more than enough votes to pass.
 
The House is expected to pass the compromise, which cuts about $38 billion from 2011 spending levels, Wednesday afternoon.
 
Senate aides expect the House to send the package to the Senate for consideration between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. Wednesday.