McCain rips lawmakers demanding amendment to balance the budget

Sen. John McCainJohn McCainSenate committee to vote Monday on Tillerson Trump fails to mention Clinton in inaugural address Hillary Clinton under microscope at inauguration MORE (Ariz.), the 2008 GOP presidential nominee, on Wednesday ripped Tea Party lawmakers and other conservatives pushing to pass a balanced-budget amendment before raising the debt limit.

In a Senate floor speech, McCain said it is “foolish” and “deceiving” for Republican colleagues to claim a balanced-budget amendment has a chance of passing by next week.

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He read aloud a Wall Street Journal editorial depicting conservatives holding out for a constitutional amendment as living in a fantasy world, such as J.R.R. Tolkien, author of “The Hobbit,” might imagine.

Members of the Senate Tea Party Caucus including Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), Mike LeeMike LeeBooker is taking orders from corporate pharmaceuticals Paul, Lee call on Trump to work with Congress on foreign policy Right renews push for term limits as Trump takes power MORE (R-Utah) and Rand PaulRand PaulDems blast Trump plans for deep spending cuts Trump team prepares dramatic cuts Paul, Lee call on Trump to work with Congress on foreign policy MORE (R-Ky.) have continued to demand a balanced-budget amendment.

DeMint, Lee, Paul and Sen. David VitterDavid VitterLobbying World Bottom Line Republicans add three to Banking Committee MORE (R-La.) wrote a letter to colleagues Tuesday urging them to oppose a fallback plan drafted by House Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerLast Congress far from ‘do-nothing’ Top aide: Obama worried about impeachment for Syria actions An anti-government ideologue like Mulvaney shouldn't run OMB MORE (R-Ohio) that would cut the deficit by $850 billion and require Congress to pass a $1.8 trillion deficit-reduction package before the election.

These lawmakers want colleagues to make another effort to pass the “Cut, Cap and Balance” act, which requires congressional passage of a balanced-budget amendment before raising the debt limit.

McCain said this goal is utterly unrealistic given Democratic control of the Senate. A balanced-budget amendment would need the support of 20 members of the Senate Democratic Caucus to pass.

“What is really amazing about this is that some members are believing that we can pass a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution in this body with its present representation — and that is foolish,” he said. “That is worse than foolish. That is deceiving many of our constituents.”

McCain said he supports a balanced-budget amendment and voted for one 13 times but thinks its unrealistic to demand one now with a potential national default only six days away.

He implied that conservative freshmen who think it’s possible to sway enough Democrats are naïve.

“That is not fair to the American people, to hold out and say we won’t agree to raising the debt limit until we pass a balanced-budget amendment to the Constitution,” McCain said. “It’s unfair, it’s bizarre. And maybe some people [who] have only been in this body for six or seven months or so really believe it.”

McCain cited the Wall Street Journal’s editorial to back up his argument.

“The idea seems to be that if the House GOP refuses to raise the debt ceiling, a default crisis or gradual government shutdown will ensue, and the public will turn en masse against ... Barack ObamaBarack ObamaCelebrity chef: Trump inauguration copied my cake for Obama Five takeaways from Trump's inauguration Michael Reagan: Trump's fighting words rattle Washington MORE,” he said, quoting the paper. “The Republican House that failed to raise the debt ceiling would somehow escape all blame. Then Democrats would have no choice but to pass a balanced-budget amendment and reform entitlements, and the Tea Party Hobbits could return to Middle Earth having defeated Mordor.”

McCain warned that House Tea Party conservatives would give President Obama a major political victory by rejecting BoehnerJohn BoehnerLast Congress far from ‘do-nothing’ Top aide: Obama worried about impeachment for Syria actions An anti-government ideologue like Mulvaney shouldn't run OMB MORE’s plan to increase the debt limit.

Quoting the Journal again, McCain said: “If conservatives defeat the Boehner plan they will not only undermine their House majority, they will go far [toward] reelecting Mr. Obama and making entitlements that much harder to reform.”