Senate conservatives say they don’t plan to delay consideration of debt-limit deal

Senate Republican conservatives say they do not plan to delay a bipartisan deal to raise the debt ceiling, giving Congress a chance to make the Aug. 2 deadline set by President Obama.

If any member of the Senate withholds his or her consent to speed up the chamber’s floor procedures, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidSenate GOP breaks record on confirming Trump picks for key court Don’t worry (too much) about Kavanaugh changing the Supreme Court Dem infighting erupts over Supreme Court pick MORE (D-Nev.) could not pass legislation to raise the debt limit before Wednesday, according to a Senate aide.

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But conservatives, including members of the Tea Party Caucus, say they do not plan to blow up the floor proceedings in protest of a deal that does not include passage of a balanced budget amendment.

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeWisconsin GOP Senate candidate rips his own parents for donations to Dems GOP moderates hint at smooth confirmation ahead for Kavanaugh GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE MORE (R-Utah), a member of the Senate Tea Party Caucus, said he would insist that any compromise receive at least 60 votes on the Senate floor but not drag out the process to delay an agreement beyond Tuesday.

“I don’t see any reason for not agreeing to an advanced time table,” Lee said. “A 60-vote threshold is one thing but there’s no reason to run the clock out any more.”

Republicans criticized Reid on Friday for not agreeing to waive debate time on the Senate Democrats’ plan to raise the debt ceiling. Republicans wanted to consider the measure on Friday. Instead, Reid insisted on holding the vote on Sunday — originally scheduled for 1 a.m.

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: Trump's Russia moves demoralize his team | Congress drops effort to block ZTE deal | Rosenstein warns of foreign influence threat | AT&T's latest 5G plans On The Money: Trump 'ready' for tariffs on all 0B in Chinese goods | Trump digs in on Fed criticism | Lawmakers drop plans to challenge Trump ZTE deal Overnight Defense: White House 'not considering' Ukraine referendum | Pompeo hopeful on plans for Putin visit | Measure to block ZTE deal dropped from defense bill MORE (R-Fla.), a conservative Republican freshman and Tea-Party favorite, said: “I’m not going to do anything procedural to slow it down."

“I haven’t thought it through but that’s not my intention,” he said.

Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) another member of the Tea Party Caucus said he would have to review the deal between Obama and GOP leaders but did not seem eager to delay Senate consideration of it beyond Tuesday.

“I don’t want to tempt fate and delay this beyond Aug. 2 but I don’t want to expedite a bad deal,” he said. “We haven’t seen the bill yet.”

DeMint, however, did not seem enthusiastic about allowing leaders to pass a short-term extension of the debt limit — perhaps for two or three days — to give negotiators more time to work something out.

“I don’t think they need one or two days, they have plenty of money to make it a week or so,” he said.

Several Republican lawmakers have argued that the Obama administration has exaggerated the importance of meeting the Aug. 2 deadline, believing the federal government has enough money in its accounts to avoid a national default.

On the other side of the political spectrum, Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersBernie Sanders: Trump 'so tough' on child separations but not on Putin Bernie Sanders tells Kansas crowd: This 'sure doesn’t look' like a GOP state The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and Congress at odds over Russia MORE (I-Vt.), one of the chamber’s most outspoken liberals, has not signaled he would slow Senate procedures to protest a debt-limit deal that drastically cuts spending without raising new taxes. Sanders voted against Reid’s debt limit plan on Sunday.

Reid told colleagues Sunday that he would move a deal — if there is one — by using a message from the House as a legislative vehicle. That would allow him to hold fewer cloture votes to pass it but would not shorten the timeline enough to guarantee a Tuesday vote. He must have unanimous consent from the entire chamber to pass it in time.