DeMint’s leadership PAC battles leaders in fight for future of Senate GOP caucus

Members of the Tea Party Caucus and the GOP leadership are in a money race that could shape the ideology of the Senate Republican Conference.

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGun proposal picks up GOP support Children’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Dems see Trump as potential ally on gun reform MORE (Ky.) remains the king of GOP fundraising, but members of the Tea Party Caucus are getting more active about electing conservatives in their mold to the upper chamber.

ADVERTISEMENT
Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), who often battles his leadership over the direction of the conference, has been more aggressive this year in the use of his fundraising committee.

And Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeWhatever you think the Alabama special election means, you’re probably wrong How the effort to replace ObamaCare failed Overnight Regulation: Trump temporarily lifts Jones Act for Puerto Rico | Bill would exempt some banks from Dodd-Frank | Senators unveil driverless car bill MORE (R-Utah), a freshman Tea Party conservative, on Tuesday announced his new political action committee, which appears modeled on DeMint’s Senate Conservatives Fund.

Lee, who defeated three-term incumbent Sen. Bob Bennett in the 2010 Utah Republican primary, said he would not rule out supporting conservative candidates who challenge centrist or liberal GOP Senate colleagues.


More from The Hill:
♦ ACLU asks how police use cellphone location data
♦ Report warns consumers to avoid 4G
♦ Pawlenty: Most global warming is natural
♦ EPA seeks to ease carbon storage barriers
♦ Critics: Proposal would block ads for popular foods
♦ Debt deal 'trigger' may be lesser evil for health sector


DeMint promised after last year’s election that he would not endorse any opponents to his fellow Republican senators. But he became angry about the debt deal the leadership struck with President Obama and could support serious challengers to Republican senators who voted for the plan, a source close to the senator told The Hill on Tuesday.

“He’s already opened the door to changing that policy in terms of supporting people in primaries — this deal could bring him to the point where he says he’s not going to make any guarantees,” said the source, who asked not to be identified because of the sensitive nature of intraparty relations. “It’s not a threat that he’s going to oppose anybody, but ... if he does, nobody should be surprised.”

Twenty-eight GOP senators voted for the deal to raise the nation’s debt ceiling, while 19 voted against it.

And with Republicans expected to make gains in the upper chamber next year — the GOP is defending 10 seats to the Democrats’ 23 — DeMint and Lee are working to bring in candidates who share their ideology.

DeMint’s Senate Conservatives Fund raised $1.99 million in the first six months of 2011, according to a fundraising report filed a few days ago with the Federal Election Commission. That’s about $600,000 more than the leadership PACs of the five most senior Senate Republican leaders put together.

In the 2010 cycle, DeMint aggressively used his PAC to support such conservative candidates as now-Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioOvernight Defense: Tillerson, Trump deny report of rift | Tillerson says he never considered resigning | Trump expresses 'total confidence' in secretary | Rubio asks Army to kick out West Point grad Rubio asks Army to kick out West Point grad with pro-communist posts GOP establishment doubts Bannon’s primary powers MORE (R-Fla.), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHouse bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance Authorizing military force is necessary, but insufficient GOP feuds with outside group over analysis of tax framework MORE (R-Ky.) and Pat Toomey (R-Pa.).

Much of DeMint’s haul this year has been spent on overhead and administrative costs. So far in 2011, DeMint’s fund has raised $138,226 for two Senate candidates, Josh Mandel in Ohio and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzWhatever you think the Alabama special election means, you’re probably wrong This week: Congress gets ball rolling on tax reform Week ahead: Senators work toward deal to fix ObamaCare markets MORE in Texas, according to a source familiar with its activity. Most of the money went to Mandel, who reported $2.1 million cash on hand for the second quarter — a high number for a challenger.

The Senate Conservatives Fund also gave $20,000 directly to the two candidates and spent $52,000 on independent expenditures to help them. 

By contrast, Senate GOP leaders prefer to raise money through the National Republican Senatorial Committee.

McConnell, for example, has raised $1.7 million for the NRSC so far this year, according to a GOP aide familiar with his fundraising activity. The minority leader was involved in raising more than $10 million for Senate GOP candidates and the committee in the 2010 cycle, according to the source.

McConnell’s leadership PAC, the Bluegrass Committee, raised $231,000 over the first six months of the year. It gave $115,000 to Senate Republican candidates and colleagues, $15,000 to the NRSC and $15,000 to the National Republican Congressional Committee.

One GOP aide said there are 33 Senate races in 2012, and lawmakers can give a maximum of $10,000 to a single candidate. So most members of the Senate GOP leadership don’t see a need to raise more than the highest-allowed total of Senate campaign contributions — about $330,000 — through their leadership PACs.

The contributions that such leaders as Senate Republican Conference Chairman Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderChildren’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Overnight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Schumer calls for attaching ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance MORE (Tenn.) and NRSC Chairman John CornynJohn CornynGun proposal picks up GOP support House bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance Republicans jockey for position on immigration MORE (Texas) give to colleagues could affect who becomes the assistant Republican leader once Sen. Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) retires at the end of next year.

Alexander, Cornyn and Senate Republican Policy Committee Chairman John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGun proposal picks up GOP support Overnight Regulation: Senate panel approves driverless car bill | House bill to change joint-employer rule advances | Treasury to withdraw proposed estate tax rule | Feds delaying Obama methane leak rule Dems see Trump as potential ally on gun reform MORE (S.D.) could find themselves in a race for the No. 2 spot in the leadership, and will be looking for support among the conference.

Alexander’s Tenn PAC raised $376,000 through the first six months of this year and had $157,000 on hand at the end of June. It gave five $5,000 contributions to colleagues including Sens. Dick Lugar (R-Ind.), Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerNevada senators urge airlines to enact new policies after Las Vegas shooting Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada GOP establishment doubts Bannon’s primary powers MORE (R-Nev.), John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoDems lambaste Trump’s ‘outrageous’ EPA chemical safety pick Overnight Regulation: EPA misses smog rule deadline | Search is on for new HHS chief | ACLU sues over abortion pill restrictions | Justices weigh gerrymandering Price resignation sets off frenzy of speculation over replacement MORE (R-Wyo.), Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerGOP establishment doubts Bannon’s primary powers Whatever you think the Alabama special election means, you’re probably wrong Breitbart charts path for 2018 midterm races MORE (R-Miss.).

Tenn PAC gave $5,000 to former Sen. George Allen (R-Va.), who is running for his old seat, and $1,000 to Rubio in November for debt retirement.

“Alexander’s leadership PAC has given to every incumbent and the NRSC this cycle,” said an aide to the Tennessee senator. “Right now our focus has to be on getting this economy healthy again so that out-of-work Americans can find good jobs, and supporting the sort of candidates who will help us enact the policies necessary to do that is important to all Republicans.”

Cornyn’s Alamo PAC raised $293,000 over the first half of the year and reported $118,000 cash on hand at the end of June. It gave $80,000 to Senate GOP colleagues, including Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerDeficit hawks voice worry over direction of tax plan The Hill Interview: Budget Chair Black sticks around for now Overnight Finance: White House requests B for disaster relief | Ex-Equifax chief grilled over stock sales | House panel approves B for border wall | Tax plan puts swing-state Republicans in tough spot MORE (Tenn.), Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchGOP eyes limits on investor tax break Children’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Overnight Finance: White House requests B for disaster relief | Ex-Equifax chief grilled over stock sales | House panel approves B for border wall | Tax plan puts swing-state Republicans in tough spot MORE (Utah), Scott Brown (Mass.), Barrasso, Lugar, Heller, Snowe and Wicker.

Thune’s Heartland Values PAC raised $252,000 in the first six months of the year and had $236,000 cash on hand at the end of June. It gave $5,000 contributions to Corker, Snowe, Brown, Heller, Barrasso, Allen and Reps. Rick Berg (R-N.D.) and Denny Rehberg (R-Mont.), who are running for Senate.


—Cameron Joseph contributed.