Grassley joins Paul in fight over drone memos

Senate Judiciary Committee ranking Republican Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyLet Robert Mueller do his job Overnight Cybersecurity: Senators eye path forward on election security bill | Facebook isn't winning over privacy advocates | New hacks target health care Juan Williams: GOP support for Trump begins to crack MORE (Iowa) on Thursday joined Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP anxiety grows over Trump’s Iran decision Overnight Defense: VA nominee on the ropes | White House signals it will fight for pick | Trump talks Syria with Macron | McConnell tees up Pompeo vote Schumer to oppose Pompeo as secretary of State MORE (R-Ky.) to demand the Obama administration make public legal memos justifying drone strikes against American citizens.

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Grassley joined Paul in calling on the Senate to block the nomination of David Barron to the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals until the memos become public.

Barron, a professor at Harvard Law School, authored at least one memo laying out the legal rationale for targeting American citizens overseas while previously serving as a lawyer at the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel (OLC). He may have had a hand in crafting as many as nine memos, according to Senate aides.

“We know that the Department of Justice relied on the legal arguments Professor Barron formulated to justify the targeted killing of an American citizen in a tribal region of Yemen in September 2011,” Grassley said on the Senate floor in reference to the radical Muslim cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, whom U.S. intelligence officials linked to a plot to blow up a Detroit-bound jetliner.

“This nomination cannot go forward unless this body -- every member of this body -- is given access to any and all secret legal opinions this nominee wrote on this critical issue,” Grassley said.

Paul sent a letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidLobbying world Senators fume over fight to change rules for Trump's nominees After Dems stood against Pompeo, Senate’s confirmation process needs a revamp MORE (D-Nev.) last week objecting to proceeding with Barron’s nomination until the OLC memos become public.

Paul raised his national profile last year when he waged a 13-hour filibuster on the Senate floor protesting the administration’s drone policy. Grassley’s vocal support for Paul’s latest critique is a sign his influence within the Senate GOP conference has grown.

The White House on Tuesday promised senators could review a secret memo penned by Barron but that has not satisfied Republican critics.

Grassley said senators need to review the full extent of Barron’s writings.

“Are senators who are up for reelection in a few short months ready to vote on this nominee without knowing the full extent of his writings on a topic as serious as the killing of an American citizen by a drone?” he asked.

“Are those senators ready to go home to face their constituents and explain that they cast a vote on that nominee without knowing all the facts?” he added.

The objections by Paul and Grassley put pressure on Democratic critics of the administration’s intelligence and drone polices such as Sens. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenSenators debate new business deduction, debt in tax law hearing Trump’s CIA pick facing brutal confirmation fight Trump struggles to get new IRS team in place MORE (Ore.), Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyOvernight Energy: Senate confirms Bridenstine as NASA chief | Watchdog probes Pruitt’s use of security detail | Emails shine light on EPA science policy changes 32 male senators back Senate women's calls to change harassment rules Duckworth brings her baby to Senate vote, drawing a crowd MORE (Ore.) and Mark UdallMark Emery UdallSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Democratic primary could upend bid for Colorado seat Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups MORE (Colo.) to use Barron’s nomination as leverage to spur Justice to publicize the drone memos.

The American Civil Liberties Union has joined Paul in opposing Barron’s confirmation unless the memos are released publicly.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyCongress should build on the momentum from spending bill Overnight Tech: Zuckerberg grilled by lawmakers over data scandal | What we learned from marathon hearing | Facebook hit with class action lawsuit | Twitter endorses political ad disclosure bill | Uber buys bike share Overnight Cybersecurity: Zuckerberg faces grilling in marathon hearing | What we learned from Facebook chief | Dems press Ryan to help get Russia hacking records | Top Trump security adviser resigning MORE (D-Vt.) has pressed the administration for information on its legal justification for targeting U.S. citizens overseas.

Barron’s nomination passed out of the Judiciary panel by a 10-8 vote in January.

Supporters of Barron's nomination note that Republicans cannot slow the process beyond requiring 30 hours of procedural time to elapse after the Senate votes to end debate on the issue. Democrats can quash a filibuster by Paul with a simple majority vote.