Reid wants new vote on jobless benefits

 

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidVirginia was a wave election, but without real change, the tide will turn again Top Lobbyists 2017: Grass roots Boehner confronted Reid after criticism from Senate floor MORE (D-Nev.) said Thursday that he will bring legislation extending unemployment benefits back to the floor as soon as it musters more Republican support.

Reid’s home-state colleague Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerAnother perfect storm: Why we must act before flood insurance runs dry Senators introduce bipartisan gun background check bill Dem PAC bullish on Senate chances MORE (R) is leading the push to woo potential Republican supporters.

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“My colleague from Nevada, Dean Heller, has been stellar in this. He has talked about this at least once a week. What he is doing is scrambling to get a few more Republicans,” Reid said.

“Of course anytime that Sen. Heller makes a little progress on this we’ll bring it back because people are just as desperate today as they were two months ago,” he added.

The Senate approved a five-month extension of unemployment benefits in April with a 59-38 vote. Six Republicans — Heller, Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsStates fill family caregiver void left by Congress GOP senator: ObamaCare fix could be in funding bill Collins: Pass bipartisan ObamaCare bills before mandate repeal MORE (Maine), Mark KirkMark KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (Ill.), Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteExplaining Democratic victories: It’s gun violence, stupid Trump voter fraud panel member fights back against critics Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada MORE (N.H.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenate bill would cut EPA funding by 0M GOP senator: ObamaCare fix could be in funding bill Collins: Pass bipartisan ObamaCare bills before mandate repeal MORE (Alaska) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanGOP defends Trump judicial nominee with no trial experience Bipartisan compromise is vital to the legislative process Senate GOP reveals different approach on tax reform MORE (Ohio) — voted for it.

The legislation stalled in the Republican-controlled House.