Reid: 'No desire' to obstruct GOP

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidThe Memo: Trump pulls off a stone-cold stunner The Memo: Ending DACA a risky move for Trump Manchin pressed from both sides in reelection fight MORE (D-Nev.) on Wednesday pledged to work with Republicans when they are in the majority and eschew the strategy of obstruction he has accused them of using against Democrats.

“I am ready, Mr. President, to work with him in good faith to make this institution function again for the American people. I saw firsthand how a strategy of destruction was debilitating to our system,” he said, addressing the Senate chair.

“I have no desire to engage in that manner,” he said.

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Democrats accused Republicans of using filibusters over the past four years to paralyze the Senate and drive down public opinion of Congress and government as part of a broader political strategy.

With Republicans set to take control of the upper chamber in January, it has raised questions about whether Democrats might seek revenge by blocking Republican initiatives in order to run against a dysfunctional GOP Congress in 2016.

Reid said that would not happen.

“I have been able to strike compromise with my Republican colleagues and I’m ready to do it again. Regardless of how you may interpret last week’s election results, it’s clear the American people want us to join together to get things done for the middle class and all Americans,” he said.

“We should be able to do that,” he added.  

He noted that voters in four conservative states, Alaska, Arkansas, Nebraska and South Dakota, last week voted to increase the minimum wage.

He argued that should give Republicans incentive to work with Democrats to pass federal minimum wage legislation, something they have strongly opposed.

The Nevada senator cited other items on the Senate Democrats’ 2014 agenda, such as lowering student loan rates and promoting pay equity between men and women, as areas of possible compromise with the GOP.

Reid also said he has no intention of wallowing in his party’s defeats in the midterm elections.

“I have always believed it wise to follow Will Rogers’ admonition: Don’t let yesterday use up too much of today,” he said.