McConnell leans on presidential candidates in bid to save ObamaCare repeal

McConnell leans on presidential candidates in bid to save ObamaCare repeal
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPompeo lacks votes for positive vote on panel GOP poised to advance rules change to speed up Trump nominees Trump has not invited Democrats, media to state dinner: report MORE (R-Ky.) is making a bull rush at the conservatives running for president who are withholding support from an ObamaCare repeal package that they feel doesn’t go far enough.

McConnell has told his conference that it needs to send something to President Obama’s desk and that he doesn’t plan to lure moderates to support the legislation by stripping out controversial language defunding Planned Parenthood.

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He’s sending a simple message to the Republican White House hopefuls: Now is the time to send a message on ObamaCare. Get on board.

“Marco has to be very careful about this,” said a Senate GOP source close to McConnell, referring to Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioStudents gather outside White House after walkout to protest gun violence Overnight Energy: Senate confirms Bridenstine as NASA chief | Watchdog probes Pruitt’s use of security detail | Emails shine light on EPA science policy changes Senate confirms Trump’s pick to lead NASA MORE (R-Fla.). “I know he’s worried about [Ted] Cruz saying this is bill is too Washington, but at the end of the day, you’ve been talking all this time about repealing ObamaCare, and this is your chance to do it.”

Rubio and Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCruz's Dem challenger slams Time piece praising Trump Race for Republican Speaker rare chance to unify party for election 32 male senators back Senate women's calls to change harassment rules MORE (R-Texas), who are both running for president, issued a joint statement last month vowing to oppose the House-passed ObamaCare repeal bill because it does not roll back the entire law. Conservative Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate confirms Trump’s pick to lead NASA Key senators warn Trump of North Korea effort on Syria Rep. Jordan: Action in Syria ‘should be debated in Congress’ MORE (R-Utah) also signed it. 

Only seven House Republicans voted against that repeal package, and the Senate version is likely to be very similar, several Senate Republicans said.

“We’re going to repeal as much of ObamaCare as possible, but the House bill got an overwhelming majority, most of the Freedom Caucus voted for it, so I think we’ll pass something similar,” said a Senate Republican who requested anonymity.

The challenge now is finding a way to change the bill just enough so that Rubio, Cruz and Lee are willing to vote yes.

A fourth potential holdout is Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPompeo lacks votes for positive vote on panel CIA declassifies memo on nominee's handling of interrogation tapes Overnight Defense: House to begin work on defense policy bill | Panel to vote Monday on Pompeo | Trump to deliver Naval Academy commencement speech | Trump appeals decision blocking suspected combatant's transfer MORE (R-Ky.), another White House hopeful.

“It’s an ObamaCare repeal bill, and it’s the only ObamaCare repeal bill that you’re going to get on the president’s desk,” said a Senate GOP aide. “All of us have been trying to figure out a way to get conservative objectives in front of the president. This is a golden opportunity to do that on the biggest domestic issue of the moment.”

“He speaks in general on the importance of doing something. As the conference decides what that something is, that’s where he ultimately will go,” another Senate GOP aide said of McConnell.

McConnell is still short of the 51 votes he needs to pass the repeal bill under a special budgetary process known as reconciliation. His allies see Rubio and Paul as the holdouts most likely to flip.

Senate Republican sources say centrist Sens. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (R-Ill.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSunday Shows Preview: Emmanuel Macron talks ahead of state dinner GOP poised to advance rules change to speed up Trump nominees Overnight Energy: Trump NASA pick advances after drama | White House office to investigate Pruitt's soundproof booth | 170 lawmakers call for Pruitt to resign MORE (R-Maine) are out of reach because of the language defunding Planned Parenthood.

“I think we have a better chance of getting the four conservatives than Kirk and Collins. I think we should be able to get Rubio, which means we’re at least one short,” said one Republican senator, who assumed that centrist Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenators press administration on mental health parity Overnight Energy: Watchdogs unveil findings on EPA, Interior controversies | GAO says EPA violated law with soundproof booth | IG says Zinke could have avoided charter flight | GOP chair probes Pruitt's four email addresses GOP fractures over push to protect Russia probe MORE (R-Alaska) and Paul can be persuaded to vote yes.

Paul indicated to Fox News host Greta Van Susteren in January that it would make sense to send a partial ObamaCare repeal package to Obama.

“I think by putting bills forward, you’re going to find out what the president will veto and what he won’t and what the middle ground is,” he said. 

But Murkowski, who represents a more conservative state than Kirk or Collins, remains a big problem for the GOP leadership. 

Moderates such as Murkowski were told the parliamentarian would rule the Planned Parenthood language couldn’t be included in the package.

But the parliamentarian, Elizabeth MacDonough, slammed that escape hatch before Veterans Day by ruling that the provision survived the Byrd Rule, the litmus test for legislation that moves under special budgetary protection.

Now GOP leaders are embracing the Planned Parenthood language and warning presidential hopefuls not to vote against it.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneHouse, Senate GOP compete for cash Overnight Tech: Alleged robocall kingpin testifies before Congress | What lawmakers learned | Push for new robocall rules | Facebook changes privacy settings ahead of new data law | Time Warner CEO defends AT&T merger at trial Senators grill alleged robocall kingpin MORE (S.D.), the third-ranking member of the Senate GOP leadership, floated the idea early last week of taking the Planned Parenthood language out of the bill, but leadership quickly reversed course.

Thune later told reporters he spoke too soon, as McConnell announced definitively Tuesday that the language would stay in place.

Now Republicans who support the reconciliation bill are making the argument that Cruz, Rubio, Paul or any other self-described conservative would be voting at their own peril to oppose it.

“We have 51 pro-life Republicans in the Senate, which is all we need to pass the reconciliation bill out of the Senate,” said a Senate GOP aide. “Why would anyone be arguing to take the Planned Parenthood language out of there? There’s plenty of reason for 51 Republicans to vote against it if Planned Parenthood language is not in there.” 

Even though the vote remains in doubt, Senate GOP leaders are projecting an air of confidence to increase pressure on their colleagues.

“I think we’re going to do it after the Thanksgiving break,” said Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynRepublicans divided over legislation protecting Mueller Democrats mull audacious play to block Pompeo Overnight Energy: Senate confirms Bridenstine as NASA chief | Watchdog probes Pruitt’s use of security detail | Emails shine light on EPA science policy changes MORE (Texas), who is helping McConnell round up votes. “We’ve been working with everyone to get to 51.”

He said his colleagues need to recognize that “this is our best option to actually put something on the president’s desk that delivers a mortal wound to ObamaCare.”

“I think it’s pretty hard to explain a no vote,” he said.

Senate Budget Committee Chairman Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziAmerica's budget deficit is a ticking time bomb Abolishing Budget Committee hits a symptom, not the disease Supreme Court weighs future of online sales taxes MORE (R-Wyo.), a key member of the whip team, told colleagues bluntly at a meeting last week, “We need to get 51 votes,” according to one lawmaker president. 

The implicit message: It’s everyone's responsibility to get there.