Flake expects role in immigration reform talks next year

“Expect to be,” Flake told reporters while walking to Sen. Jon Kyl’s (R-Ariz.) whip office.

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Flake, along with Sen.-elect Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzDebbie Wasserman Schultz marks 10 years as breast cancer survivor Foreign agent registration is no magical shield against Russian propaganda Let Trump be Trump and he'll sail through 2020 MORE (R) of Texas and freshman Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRyan pledges 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Richard Gere welcomes lawmakers' words of support for Tibet Dem lawmaker gives McConnell's tax reform op-ed a failing grade MORE (R-Fla.), is expected to make up the core of any Republican group supporting bipartisan Senate immigration reform next year.

Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat Meghan McCain knocks Bannon: 'Who the hell are you' to criticize Romney? Dems demand Tillerson end State hiring freeze, consult with Congress MORE (R-Ariz.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration We are running out of time to protect Dreamers US trade deficit rises on record imports from China MORE (R-S.C.) will also play important roles. Graham has restarted talks with Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerAmerica isn't ready to let Sessions off his leash Schumer celebrates New York Giants firing head coach: ‘About time’ GOP should reject the left's pessimism and the deficit trigger MORE (D-N.Y.) on a framework for reform.

Republican Party strategists say the party needs to improve its performance with Hispanic voters and persistent conservative opposition to comprehensive immigration reform has been a sore point with this crucial electoral bloc. 

President Obama has said passing immigration reform would be a priority in 2013 and last week House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerJohn Feehery: A political forest fire Trump's pick for Federal Reserve chief is right choice at right time The two-party system is dying — let’s put it out of its misery MORE (R-Ohio) signaled support for addressing the issue, saying that a “comprehensive approach” was “long overdue.”