Senators told not to make New Year's Eve plans as talks continue

Senators have been warned they may be spending New Year's Eve together -- working on a last-minute deal to avoid the "fiscal cliff."

"We've all been told not to make plans," Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire McCaskillOvernight Tech: Obama heads back to Silicon Valley | FCC meeting preview | Yahoo bans terror content | Zuckerberg on sit-in live streams Senator shares frustrating call with cable company Hate TV customer service? So does your senator MORE (D-Mo.) told reporters in the Capital on Sunday evening. "We're all going to be here through tomorrow night, the first, the second, the third and so-on."

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Senate Democrats spent almost two hours meeting with their leadership on Sunday afternoon as Senate Republicans huddled with their leaders just down the hall.

Both sides emerged from their meetings without news of a deal that would stave off tax raises and spending cuts set to go into effect on Jan. 1. 

Most of the lawmakers looked pessimistic as they came out of the conference rooms to find hordes of reporters waiting on them.

Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) said "I'd be shocked" if a deal was done on Sunday.

Sen. Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiIf 'bipartisanship' is now a dirty word, how about a rebranding? Overnight Energy: Senate panel approves EPA spending, rules bill Senate panel breaks with House on cuts to IRS MORE (D-Md.) described the mood of the Democrats' meeting as "grim" despite the smatter of applause that rang out at different points.

And retiring Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine), who is celebrating her last week in the upper chamber, had harsh words for her colleagues. She described the situation as "self-imposed" and a "failure of historic proportions."

But some senators tried to keep the mood light-hearted.

"I had a nice flight back from Vermont this afternoon -- gritting my teeth the whole way," joked Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick LeahySenate Dems rip GOP on immigration ruling Bernie Sanders’s awkward return to the Senate Senate heads toward internet surveillance fight MORE (D-Vt.).

The upper chamber has been back in Washington since Wednesday while the House returned Sunday. Negotiations between the two sides remain ongoing.

McCaskill, asked if she was more optimistic now than she had been in this morning, responded: "I wouldn't say that."