Ryan to present budget plan to Senate GOP

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul RyanGOP rep: Virginia defeat 'a referendum' on Trump administration After Texas shooting, lawmakers question whether military has systemic reporting problem Pence: Praying 'takes nothing away' from trying to figure out causes behind mass shooting MORE (R-Wis.) will meet with Senate Republicans for lunch Tuesday to present his plan to balance the budget in 10 years.

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoThis week: GOP seeks to advance tax overhaul Dissent is democratic: Stop calling McCain, Corker, Flake RINOs The farm bill presents a chance to lighten the regulatory burden of farmers MORE (R-Wyo.), vice chairman of the Senate Republican Conference, announced the news on Twitter.

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“Honored to host @RepPaulRyan at tomorrow’s @Senate_RPC policy lunch. Look forward to hearing about his plan to balance the budget,” Barrasso wrote.

Senate Republicans are expected to vote on Ryan’s plan this week, when the upper chamber will also consider a Democratic plan to cut $1.85 trillion from the deficit.

Ryan’s budget would cut spending by $4.6 trillion — or $5.7 trillion compared to the Congressional Budget Office baseline — and create a $7 billion surplus in 2023.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Finance: GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few no votes | Highlights from day two of markup | House votes to overturn joint-employer rule | Senate panel approves North Korean banking sanctions GOP criticism of tax bill grows, but few ready to vote against it Anti-gay marriage county clerk Kim Davis to seek reelection in Kentucky MORE (R-Texas) and other conservatives have criticized Ryan’s budget for not repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act entirely. Ryan’s budget would keep $716 billion in Medicare cuts mandated by the healthcare reform law. Ryan has said those savings would be used to extend the solvency of the program.

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Centrist Democrats such as Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsBipartisan group of lawmakers aim to reform US sugar program A bipartisan bridge opens between the House and Senate Gaming the odds of any GOP tax bill getting signed into law MORE (R-Maine) and Mark KirkMark KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (R-Ill.) could balk at steep cuts to domestic discretionary programs and the implementation of a premium support system to compete with Medicare, both called for by Ryan’s budget.

Collins and Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMoore digs in amid mounting GOP criticism Republicans float pushing back Alabama special election Moore defends himself as pressure mounts MORE (R-Alaska) voted in May of 2011 against a motion to consider a similar budget crafted by Ryan.