Few senators sacrifice pay amid cuts

Only a few senators are planning to forfeit a portion of their salaries to charity or the U.S. Treasury while sequestration is in effect, according to a survey conducted by The Hill.

The Senate last month passed a measure urging members of the upper chamber to forgo 20 percent of their salary during sequestration. Most senators, however, are keeping quiet on whether they will follow through.

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During a marathon session of budget votes, the Senate approved by voice vote an amendment from Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamSenators to Obama: Make 'timely' call on Afghan troops levels Senate amendments could sink email privacy compromise Trump: Romney 'walks like a penguin' MORE (R-S.C.) calling on lawmakers to donate 20 percent of their pay to charity or return it to the U.S. Treasury.

In his floor speech, Graham noted that about 500,000 to 600,000 federal employees will be furloughed because of sequestration and that senators should “feel what other people are feeling.”

Yet in a survey of Senate offices by The Hill, only Graham and Sens. Mark BegichMark BegichEx-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Unable to ban Internet gambling, lawmakers try for moratorium Dem ex-lawmakers defend Schumer on Iran MORE (D-Alaska), Claire McCaskillClaire McCaskillWhy Wasserman Schultz must go Sanders aide: Easier for Dems to unify if Wasserman Schultz steps down Dem senator: DNC head ‘has to make a decision’ on her own future MORE (Mo.), Mike LeeMike LeeOvernight Cybersecurity: Guccifer plea deal raises questions in Clinton probe Senate panel delays email privacy vote amid concerns Senate amendments could sink email privacy compromise MORE (R-Utah) and Jay RockefellerJay RockefellerLobbying world Overnight Tech: Senators place holds on FCC commissioner Overnight Tech: Senate panel to vote on Dem FCC commissioner MORE (D-W.Va.) have indicated they would give up some of their take-home pay.

In a recent press release, Begich — who is up for reelection in 2014 — said he will be voluntarily returning a portion of his salary to the Treasury this year. 

Several other senators said they already donate generously to charity, while the majority of offices gave no response at all.

Senators make $174,000 annually. To fully comply with the Graham measure for a complete calendar year, members would return $34,000 to charity or the Treasury. To most people, that’s a lot of money; but for some members, that is chump change. About half of the lawmakers in Congress are millionaires.

Budget votes are nonbinding, and the fiscal blueprint passed by the Democratic-led Senate will not become law, but member salaries have drawn added attention during a time of belt-tightening across Washington. 

While congressional offices are subject to the across-the-board spending reductions as part of sequestration, lawmaker salaries are exempt.

The very passage of the budget by a slim majority on March 23 ensured that senators would continue receiving their salaries. Congress enacted a provision earlier this year stipulating that if either the House or Senate failed to pass a budget resolution, the pay of its members would be withheld.

“We should lead by example,” Graham told The Hill before introducing his amendment. “Every member of Congress should give up 20 percent of their pay to the charity of their choice or wherever they want to spend the money, just get it out of their hands, their account, because that’s what they’re doing to the private sector.”

Graham mentioned the example of Ashton Carter, the deputy Defense secretary who told a Senate committee in February that he would voluntarily forgo 20 percent of his salary if his employees were subject to furloughs because of sequestration.

The Pentagon on Tuesday announced Defense Secretary Chuck HagelChuck HagelHagel says NATO deployment could spark a new Cold War with Russia Overnight Defense: House panel unveils 5B defense spending bill Hagel to next president: We need to sit down with Putin MORE will also follow suit by writing a check to the Treasury.

Graham spokesman Kevin Bishop said the senator donated 20 percent of his salary and that he had spoken about the Wounded Warriors or the American Cancer Society charities as likely to receive his contribution. Bishop declined to comment on what other senators are choosing to do.

Other senators, including McCaskill, Bill NelsonBill NelsonTen senators ask FCC to delay box plan Senators to House: FAA reauthorization would enhance airport security Dems discuss dropping Wasserman Schultz MORE (D-Fla.) and Barbara MikulskiBarbara MikulskiSenate backs equal pay for female soccer players Lawmakers push to elevate Cyber Command in Senate defense bill Dems discuss dropping Wasserman Schultz MORE (D-Md.), have addressed or introduced proposals calling for congressional salaries to be subject to sequestration. But some top lawmakers have criticized the repeated attempts to target member salaries. 

“I don’t think we should do it; I think we should respect the work we do,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) told reporters in February. “I think it’s necessary for us to have the dignity of the job that we have rewarded.”

In The Hill survey, spokesmen for Rockefeller and Lee said they planned to donate a portion of their salaries, while aides to Sens. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyTen senators ask FCC to delay box plan Overnight Cybersecurity: Guccifer plea deal raises questions in Clinton probe Could Romanian hacker ‘Guccifer’ assist FBI’s probe of Clinton? MORE (R-Iowa), John McCainJohn McCainTrump should apologize to heroic POWs McCain urges sports leagues to return 'paid patriotism' money Senators to Obama: Make 'timely' call on Afghan troops levels MORE (R-Ariz.), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonGOP senators: Obama bathroom guidance is 'not appropriate' Amateur theatrics: An insult to Africa Dem senator blocks push to tie 'gun ban' to spending bill MORE (R-Ga.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersWATCH LIVE: Trump holds Calif. rally after backing out of Sanders debate Sanders blasts Trump: 'What are you afraid of?' Tech firm offers M for Trump-Sanders debate MORE (I-Vt.), Jeff SessionsJeff SessionsGOP senator: 'I would consider’ being Trump’s VP Senate panel delays email privacy vote amid concerns Senate amendments could sink email privacy compromise MORE (R-Ala.) and Angus KingAngus KingSenators to Obama: Make 'timely' call on Afghan troops levels Lawmakers push to elevate Cyber Command in Senate defense bill House, Senate at odds on new authority for cyber war unit MORE (I-Maine) said their bosses already contribute some of their income to charity.

“I asked Sen. Grassley and he said that he and Mrs. Grassley already ‘more than tithe’ to their church and charities, so this amendment won’t affect their giving,” Grassley spokeswoman Jill Gerber said.

An aide to Sen. Bob CorkerBob CorkerRubio: 'Maybe' would run for Senate seat if 'good friend' wasn't McConnell-allied group: We'll back Rubio if he runs for reelection The Trail 2016: Interleague play MORE (R-Tenn.) said he has never accepted a Senate salary and instead gives his pay to the Community Foundation of Greater Chattanooga, which distributes it to local charities. Corker is worth at least $19.6 million, according to financial reports from 2011. 

A Sessions spokesman noted that as the top Republican on the Senate Budget Committee, he had voluntarily cut his committee office budget by 15 percent to demonstrate his commitment to reduced federal spending. Other members of both the House and Senate have also previously announced voluntary cuts to their office budgets or that they have returned part of their salaries to the Treasury.

Updated at 10:10 a.m.: Sen. McCaskill's office said she has also committed to giving a portion of her salary to charity or to the Treasury.

— Taylor Seale, Zach DeRitis, Noura Alfadl-Andreasson, Amrita Khalid and Alex Lazar contributed.