Support snowballs ahead of Senate immigration reform vote

Immigration reform has gotten a new burst of life as a growing number of Senate Republicans have embraced the 1,000-page-plus legislation, setting up President Obama for a big victory this week. [WATCH VIDEO]

The sudden surge in Republican support has been a pleasant surprise for Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidWATCH: There is no Trump-Russia collusion and the media should stop pushing this The demise of debate in Congress ‘North by Northwest,’ the Carter Page remake MORE (D-Nev.), who urged the bill’s authors to focus on winning 60 votes — the minimum for passing it.

Instead, Sens. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDemocrats now attack internet rules they once embraced Schumer: Trump budget would ‘cripple’ gun background checks Schumer: Senate Republicans' silence 'deafening' on guns, Russia MORE (D-N.Y.) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainLawmakers worry about rise of fake video technology Democrats put Dreamers and their party in danger by playing hardball Trump set a good defense budget, but here is how to make it better MORE (R-Ariz.), the leaders of the Gang of Eight, are marching toward 70 votes, a target intended to put maximum pressure on the House to act.

The House is the X factor. The lower chamber is expected to pass narrow immigration bills that do not include a path to citizenship, which is a staple of the Senate legislation. Conservatives in the House, including Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerRestoring fiscal sanity requires bipartisan courage GOP congressman slams primary rival for Ryan donations Speculation swirls about Kevin McCarthy’s future MORE (R-Ohio), strongly oppose the Senate bill.

Still, an overwhelming bipartisan vote would be a strong boost for a Senate bill that just days ago was teetering.

Schumer said Sunday the bill has support from about two-thirds of the Senate’s members and predicted it would attract “in the neighborhood of 70 votes” for final passage.

He said such an outcome would put pressure on House Republicans to accept legislation similar to the Senate bill and warned of massive demonstrations in Washington if BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerRestoring fiscal sanity requires bipartisan courage GOP congressman slams primary rival for Ryan donations Speculation swirls about Kevin McCarthy’s future MORE refused.

“If he tries to bottle it up or do things like that, I could see a million people on the mall in Washington,” he said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

The bill’s authors secured extra Republican votes by striking a deal with Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCongress punts fight over Dreamers to March Drama surrounding Shulkin — what is the future of VA health care? Blackburn pushes back on potential Corker bid: 'I'm going to win' MORE (R-Tenn.) and John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenSenate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA GOP anxious with Trump on trade GOP lawmakers to Trump: Don't fire Mueller MORE (R-N.D.) to double the number of patrol agents and construct 700 miles of fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border at a cost of roughly $38 billion. 

The measure includes a provision that would prevent immigrants from claiming credit for time spent working illegally when it comes to calculating Social Security benefits. It would also ensure welfare dollars do not go to immigrants with provisional legal status.

The deal created some friction with liberal Democrats such as Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyGrassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees Popular bill to fight drug prices left out of budget deal Judiciary Dems want public hearings with Kushner, Trump Jr. MORE (D-Vt.), who argued that a promise of $4.5 billion in new border-security technology spending is a potential magnet for waste and fraud.

Leahy grumbled that the Corker-Hoeven language “reads like a Christmas wish list for Halliburton.”

Speaking on the Senate floor, he added, “I am sure there are federal contracting firms high-fiving at the prospect of all of the spending demanded by some of our friends on the other side.”

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersDems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee 2020 Dem contenders travel to key primary states After Florida school shooting, vows for change but no clear path forward MORE (Vt.), a liberal independent who caucuses with Democrats, has spoken out against what he has called a “massive increase in temporary guest worker programs” at a time of high unemployment. But Sanders is likely to vote for the bill after negotiators agreed to provide $1.5 billion over two years for a youth jobs program.

Negotiators secured the support of Sen. Mark BegichMark Peter BegichPerez creates advisory team for DNC transition The future of the Arctic 2016’s battle for the Senate: A shifting map MORE (Alaska), another swing Democratic vote, by including language ensuring immigrant labor for Alaskan seafood processors — an arrangement that has already been dubbed “the Crabhusker kickback.”

Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (Ark.), the most vulnerable Democratic incumbent in the 2014 election, says he is leaning in favor of the bill. His pledge puts Reid on a trajectory to pass it with the support of all 54 members of the Democratic caucus.

Senate opponents of the legislation had done a good job keeping their Republican colleagues in check up to the middle of last week. 

Last Tuesday, Sen. John CornynJohn CornynLawmakers feel pressure on guns Kasich’s campaign website tones down gun language after Florida shooting Murphy: Trump’s support for background check bill shows gun politics ‘shifting rapidly’ MORE (R-Texas) said the legislation “could fall apart quickly” without an agreement on border security. A day later, even Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioColbert: Students taking action on gun violence 'give me hope' Lawmakers feel pressure on guns Florida lawmaker's aide fired after claiming shooting survivors were 'actors' MORE (R-Fla.), a pivotal member of the Gang of Eight, declined to say whether he would vote “yes” on final passage.

The political calculus quickly changed on Thursday morning as news of the Corker-Hoeven deal spread. By early afternoon, reporters were already asking Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsUnder pressure, Trump shifts blame for Russia intrusion Overnight Tech: Judge blocks AT&T request for DOJ communications | Facebook VP apologizes for tweets about Mueller probe | Tech wants Treasury to fight EU tax proposal Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand MORE (R-Ala.) and other opponents if they were fighting a “losing battle.”

Fox News host Bill O’Reilly became a harbinger of conservative support when he endorsed the Senate bill on Thursday.

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLawmakers feel pressure on guns Bipartisan group of House lawmakers urge action on Export-Import Bank nominees Curbelo Dem rival lashes out over immigration failure MORE (Ky.), the Democrats’ top electoral target next year, opened the door for a larger bipartisan vote by not trying to rein in any Republicans from backing it. At the outset of the debate, he said he hoped the Senate would pass a bill. 

The likelihood of McConnell voting for the bill dropped Sunday when his home-state colleague Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulDem wins Kentucky state House seat in district Trump won by 49 points GOP's tax reform bait-and-switch will widen inequality Pentagon budget euphoria could be short-lived MORE (R-Ky.) announced on CNN that he would vote against it for not guaranteeing border security before granting legal status to millions of people.

Sessions said Republican support for the Corker-Hoeven amendment could wane as senators learn more of its details.

He noted the legislation would not require the full deployment of 20,000 additional border patrol agents until 2021 and would let Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano dispense with the fence-building requirement if she judges it unnecessary.

“If people find out this amendment does not accomplish what the sponsors believe it does, I think the bill could be back in trouble again,” he said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

Reid admitted Friday that he had not thought the bill would win 70 votes. He initially pushed back against the target, fearing that meeting it would require steep concessions.

“No one other than the senator from New York thought we could get 70 votes,” Reid said on the floor, referring to Schumer. “I doubted he could get 70 votes. He knows I doubted that. No one in this body thought we could get 68, 72 votes except him.”

Reid has scheduled a vote on the Corker-Hoeven compromise, which is expected to pass easily, on Monday and a vote to end debate on the broader bill on Thursday. His schedule would set up a vote on final passage before lawmakers leave for the July 4 recess.

The Nevada Democrat predicted last week that “there’s going to be significant national pressure on the House to do something on immigration.”

Even though there is renewed optimism in the Senate, there is growing skepticism that the GOP-led House will ever accept a bill that includes a pathway to citizenship. 

Last week’s collapse of the farm bill, which required support from both sides of the aisle, led to partisan finger-pointing. If any immigration bill is going to get to Obama’s desk this year, it will have to be backed by both parties.