Democrat on Democrat: Warren spars with Manchin on student loan proposal

Liberal firebrand Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOvernight Finance: Lawmakers grill Equifax chief over hack | Wells Fargo CEO defends bank's progress | Trump jokes Puerto Rico threw budget 'out of whack' | Mortgage tax fight tests industry clout Michelle Obama is exactly who the Democrats need to win big in 2020 Wells Fargo chief defends bank's progress in tense Senate hearing MORE (Mass.) blasted a fellow Democratic senator Tuesday as a dispute over student loan rates escalated divisions within the party.

The clash, which is highly unusual among party colleagues in the upper chamber, came at a private caucus meeting about a subject that is helping Republicans land blows against their Democratic opponents.

“Elizabeth came out very strong against Manchin,” said a Democratic senator who requested anonymity to discuss the exchange. “She said, ‘They’re already making money off the backs of students, and this adds another $1 billion.’”

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Warren was referring to a deal Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Energy: EPA aims to work more closely with industry Overnight Finance: Lawmakers grill Equifax chief over hack | Wells Fargo CEO defends bank's progress | Trump jokes Puerto Rico threw budget 'out of whack' | Mortgage tax fight tests industry clout Lawmakers try again on miners’ pension bill MORE (D-W.Va.) and two other members of the caucus, Sens. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperOvernight Energy: Dems take on Trump's chemical safety pick Dems lambaste Trump’s ‘outrageous’ EPA chemical safety pick Infrastructure spending bill sliding down agenda MORE (D-Del.) and Angus KingAngus Stanley KingSenate confirms No. 2 spot at HHS, days after Price resigns Overnight Defense: Mattis offers support for Iran deal | McCain blocks nominees over Afghanistan strategy | Trump, Tillerson spilt raises new questions about N. Korea policy Mattis: Staying in Iran deal is of US national security interest MORE (I-Maine), struck with Republicans to peg student-lending rates to the 10-year Treasury notes. 

Sen. Tom HarkinTom HarkinThe Hill's 12:30 Report Distance education: Tumultuous today and yesterday Grassley challenger no stranger to defying odds MORE (D-Iowa), the chairman of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, stood up to announce to colleagues that a fact card passed out by Manchin summarizing his proposal contained two mistakes.

Harkin disputed Manchin’s claim that, under the bipartisan proposal, the interest rates for new Stafford loans would be 3.66 percent. Harkin said that claim failed to reflect that under the Manchin proposal, the rates on undergraduate Stafford loans would hit 7.1 percent by 2019.

Under the law that expired on July 1, the rate for subsidized Stafford loans was 3.4 percent. It has jumped to 6.8 percent and will remain at that level until Congress acts.

Harkin also hit Manchin for claiming the bipartisan plan places a cap on interest rates.

The bipartisan proposal in the Senate would cap student loan rates at 8.25 percent, but only for consolidated loans, not individual ones.

Manchin and his allies, Carper and King, pushed back against the pressure. They took the rare step of holding a competing press conference with reporters in the Ohio Clock corridor while Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Republicans are headed for a disappointing end to their year in power Obama's HHS secretary could testify in Menendez trial MORE (D-Nev.) touted a separate Democratic proposal to reporters. That plan, sponsored by Sen. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Raymond ReedTop general says Iran complying with nuclear deal Top general: Transgender troops shouldn't be separated from military Dems ask FEC to create new rules in response to Russian Facebook ads MORE (D-R.I.), would freeze the rate for subsidized Stafford loans at 3.4 percent for another year.

The bipartisan plan endorsed by Manchin and the others would set interest rates for undergraduate Stafford loans at the 10-year Treasury rate plus 1.85 percent. It would set the rates for unsubsidized graduate Stafford loans at the 10-year Treasury rate plus 3.4 percent.

It would reduce the deficit by $1 billion over 10 years, which Warren and other liberals have characterized as balancing the budget on the backs of students.

The rival messages appeared to exasperate Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOvernight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Crying on TV doesn't qualify Kimmel to set nation's gun agenda Trump knocks ‘fake’ news coverage of his trip to Puerto Rico MORE (N.Y.), the Senate Democratic messaging chief, who engaged in an animated conversation with Manchin, Carper and King before they met with reporters.

Reid tersely described Tuesday’s caucus meeting as “lively.”

While Manchin, Carper and King stood only a few yards down the ornate corridor outside the Senate chamber, Reid drew a line, declaring he would only back a plan that guarantees student loan rates will remain below the current 6.8-percent rate.

“I’ve told my caucus, I’ve told individual senators, if you can explain to me why doing something is better than doing nothing, then we’ll do it,” he said. “All the proposals, within two years, at the outside three years, make the rate more than 6.8 percent.”

Backers of tying the loan rates to Treasury bonds point out that it would result in lower rates now, but Reid said that interest rates are just now beginning to rise from all-time lows, with nowhere to go but up.

“We have the lowest interest rates we’ve had in the history of this country,” he said. “Interest rates are going to go up, and who’s going to suffer from that? Students.”

 After speaking to reporters, Reid planned to meet with Education Secretary Arne DuncanArne DuncanTrump administration is putting profits over students Chicago to make future plans a graduation requirement: report Top Education official resigned over dispute with DeVos: report MORE and White House chief of staff Denis McDonoughDenis McDonoughDNC chairman to teach at Brown University Trump mocked Obama for three chiefs of staff in three years Former Obama UN ambassador to meet with Senate Intelligence panel: report MORE to further discuss the matter.

Manchin and Carper said they hoped their proposal would receive a vote on the Senate floor, but Harkin said that would not happen Wednesday.

“Why should there be a side-by-side?” he said.

Harkin said Manchin could offer his plan as an amendment if the Senate votes to proceed on the Democratic alternative freezing the rate for subsidized Stafford loans at 3.4 percent for one year.  

The Senate will vote Wednesday to end debate on the motion to proceed to that measure.

Proponents of a one-year freeze of the lower, 3.4 percent rate argued ahead of the floor vote that Congress should tackle the rate as part of comprehensive reforms to higher education, coming as part of the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.

“It will give us time to look at student lending in a comprehensive way,” said Reed.

There were indications Tuesday that Democrats were looking for some sort of compromise, and some may be enticed to join the market-based approach pushed by Manchin and others. Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillKoch-backed group targets red-state Dems on tax reform Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax security employee left after breach | Lawmakers float bill to reform warrantless surveillance | Intel leaders keeping collusion probe open Las Vegas highlights Islamist terrorism is not America's greatest domestic threat MORE (D-Mo.), said she could back student loan interest rates based on market movements as long as there are sufficient caps on the rates.

“We might find a sweet spot if we could do a little bit of market, a little bit of caps, and see if we can’t put together a bipartisan group on that,” she said.

And Sen. Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyDem senator: Inaction on gun control sending 'unintentional endorsement' Congress has a chance to make saving for college a lot easier Sen. Manchin won’t vote for Trump’s mine safety nominee MORE Jr. (D-Pa.), who is a co-sponsor on Reed’s one-year freeze bill, said he was very interested in finding a longer-term solution.

“I’m willing to listen to anything,” he said. “I think it’s vital we start trying to move forward on a longer-term plan.”

Despite the efforts of Manchin and King, it was clear that some liberal lawmakers would not be swayed.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Clip shows Larry David and Bernie Sanders reacting after discovering they're related For now, Trump dossier creates more questions than answers MORE (I-Vt.), a strong proponent of freezing the lower rates, called the bipartisan bill “totally insane.”

“The American people would laugh at that. It’s not a proposal,” he told The Hill, adding that the administration’s push for a market-based student loan rate is also a nonstarter.

“We should make sure working families in this nation can afford college,” he said. “The White House’s proposal is absurd as well.”

Meanwhile, Senate Republicans looked to keep up pressure on Democrats, again highlighting that the White House has also called for student loan rates tied to Treasury bonds.

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderChildren’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Overnight Health Care: Schumer calls for tying ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance | Puerto Rico's water woes worsen | Dems plead for nursing home residents' right to sue Schumer calls for attaching ObamaCare fix to children's health insurance MORE (R-Tenn.), who is a co-sponsor of the compromise bill, said a one-year freeze would leave students “twisting in the wind,” and make student loans a regular political football like the so-called “doc fix.”

— Published at 4:56 p.m. and updated at 8:23 p.m.