Graham: 99 percent of senators believe Russia interfered in election

Graham: 99 percent of senators believe Russia interfered in election
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Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamTrump’s UN pick threads needle on Russia, NATO Haley slams United Nations, echoing Trump Haley to question US funding of UN: report MORE (R-S.C.) says President-elect Donald TrumpDonald TrumpOvernight Energy: Trump's EPA pick faces Congress | 2016 is the hottest year on record Ukrainian president urges US to confront Russian aggression Trump tweets get-well wishes to Bush family MORE is at odds with nearly the entire Senate over whether Russia interfered in the election.

“There are 100 United States senators. ... I would say that 99 percent of us believe that the Russians did this, and we’re going to do something about it,” Graham told CNN’s Jim Sciutto on “The Situation Room” on Tuesday.

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Graham appeared alongside Sen. John McCainJohn McCainUS democracy is in crisis. Trump voters must help us get past it. The rise of Carlson, and the fall of Van Susteren Booker to vote against Tillerson MORE (R-Ariz.) from Estonia, a Baltic nation he said knows firsthand the danger Russia represents.

“It’s just not in our backyard. [Russia’s] doing it all over the world, not just the United States. They’re interfering in elections in democratic countries’ efforts to self-determination all over the world," Graham said.

"Along with Sen. McCain, after this trip is over, we’re going to have the hearings. We’re going to put sanctions together that hit [Russian President Vladimir] Putin as an individual and his inner circle for interfering in our election.”

Graham, McCain and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharTrump could mean new momentum for drug imports Sanders to roll out bill letting Medicare negotiate drug prices WHIP LIST: How many Dems will back Sessions? MORE (D-Minn.) are meeting with officials across a wide array of European nations who have issues with Russia. The trio of senators will journey to Georgia, Latvia, Lithuania, Montenegro and Ukraine after departing Estonia.

The U.S. intelligence community publicly said during the election that Russia was behind the hacks of Democratic groups. And a CIA assessment reportedly concluded that the Kremlin was interfering specifically to help Trump win.

Both Trump and Moscow have denied Russian involvement in the election.