Sessions pledges to recuse himself from Clinton investigations

Sessions pledges to recuse himself from Clinton investigations
© Greg Nash

Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsObama administration official: Separating migrant families undermines Melania Trump's 'Be Best' initiative Obama Homeland Security Secretary: Trump immigration policy 'unsustainable' Trump rips Democrats for allowing MS-13 'animals' into country MORE (R-Ala.) said Tuesday he would recuse himself from any possible investigations related to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSunday Shows preview: Lawmakers, Trump allies discuss Russia probe, migrant family separation Giuliani: FBI, prosecutors investigating Trump belong in the psych ward Des Moines Register front page warns Iowa could lose up to 4M from Chinese tariffs MORE if he is confirmed as President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpSunday Shows preview: Lawmakers, Trump allies discuss Russia probe, migrant family separation Seth McFarlane: Fox News makes me 'embarrassed' to work for this company  'Art of the Deal' co-author: Trump would act like Kim Jong Un if he had the same powers MORE's attorney general.

Sessions said during a confirmation hearing the politically charged comments he made about the Clintons during the presidential campaign would give the appearance he is not impartial in potential probes of the private email server she used while secretary of State or of the Clinton Foundation.

"I do believe that that could place my objectivity in question," Sessions told Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyPruitt’s new problem with the GOP: Ethanol Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Dems see midterm advantage in new ObamaCare fight Senate Judiciary urges response to sexual harassment in federal courts MORE (R-Iowa). "I believe the proper thing for me to do would be for me to recuse myself."

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Republicans in Congress have vowed to continue an investigation into Clinton’s private email setup.

Sessions’s comments are designed to assuage critics who believe the Justice Department could be politicized under Trump.

The Alabama senator was a vocal campaign supporter of Trump, who suggested that Clinton should be imprisoned for her private email setup.

Sessions said he would refuse an order from the president to name a special prosecutor to go after Clinton, a move Trump called for during the campaign.

“I believe that would be the best approach for the country because we can never have a political dispute turn into a criminal dispute,” Sessions said. “This country does not punish its political enemies. What this country ensures [is] that no one is above the law.”

But it’s unclear whether Trump wants to continue with such a probe as president. 

If an investigation does go forward, it would likely be overseen by Sessions’s deputy if he is confirmed.

Read more from The Hill:

Live coverage of Sessions confirmation hearing