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Cory Booker kicks off 2020 maneuvering in the Senate

Cory Booker kicks off 2020 maneuvering in the Senate
© Haiyun Jiang

Sen. Cory Booker’s (D-N.J.) decision to testify Wednesday against Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsUnder pressure, Trump shifts blame for Russia intrusion Overnight Tech: Judge blocks AT&T request for DOJ communications | Facebook VP apologizes for tweets about Mueller probe | Tech wants Treasury to fight EU tax proposal Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand MORE (R-Ala.), President-elect Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpAccuser says Trump should be afraid of the truth Woman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Shulkin says he has White House approval to root out 'subversion' at VA MORE’s pick for attorney general, is the first clear signal that the 2020 maneuvering in the upper chamber has begun. 

Booker is taking the unprecedented step of testifying against a fellow senator who has been selected for a Cabinet post.

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The 47-year-old is one of a handful of Senate Democrats viewed as promising candidates for the White House in 2020 at a time when few governors are considered top-flight options to challenge Trump in four years.

He is using a strategy that other senators are expected to employ over the next several years to boost their national profile: taking a hard line against the Trump administration.

The others are Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump's SEC may negate investors' ability to fight securities fraud Schatz's ignorance of our Anglo-American legal heritage illustrates problem with government Dems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee MORE (Mass.), who has a large loyal following within the liberal grass roots; Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandAmerican women will decide who wins and loses in 2018 elections Dems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee Calls mount from Dems to give platform to Trump accusers  MORE (N.Y.) and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand Dems seek reversal of nursing home regulatory rollback MORE (Minn.), two leading women in the upper chamber; Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyLawmakers feel pressure on guns Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks Kasich’s campaign website tones down gun language after Florida shooting MORE (Conn.), who has made a name for himself on gun control; Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownLawmaker interest in NAFTA intensifies amid Trump moves Dem senator shares photo praising LeBron James after Laura Ingraham attacks Trump gets recommendation for steep curbs on imported steel, risking trade war MORE (Ohio), who represents a pivotal battleground state; and Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineSave lives, restore congressional respect by strengthening opioids’ seizure Overnight Finance: Lawmakers, Treasury look to close tax law loopholes | Trump says he backs gas tax hike | Markets rise despite higher inflation | Fannie Mae asks for .7B Bipartisan Senate group says they have immigration deal MORE (Va.), Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWoman behind pro-Trump Facebook page denies being influenced by Russians Trump: CNN, MSNBC 'got scammed' into covering Russian-organized rally Pennsylvania Democrats set to win big with new district map MORE’s running mate in 2016.

Warren has been the most active of this group in rallying her demoralized party to stand up to the president-elect, focusing her criticism on Sessions and senior Trump adviser Stephen Bannon. 

Senate Democratic Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDemocrats now attack internet rules they once embraced Schumer: Trump budget would ‘cripple’ gun background checks Schumer: Senate Republicans' silence 'deafening' on guns, Russia MORE (N.Y.) struck a conciliatory tone right after the election by pledging to look for common ground with Trump, though he has also vowed to fight the incoming administration when necessary. The Democratic base wants the party to take on Trump, whom many liberals view with fear and disdain.

Booker’s plan to appear before the Judiciary Committee on Wednesday in an attempt to derail Sessions’s confirmation is being viewed as a bold move to raise his profile.

“It takes a lot of guts for a United States senator to go in to offer testimony in opposition to one of his colleagues. … I can’t remember this ever happening,” said Tad Devine, a Democratic strategist who served as a senior adviser to Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersDems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee 2020 Dem contenders travel to key primary states After Florida school shooting, vows for change but no clear path forward MORE’s (I-Vt.) presidential campaign last year.

The testimony will give Booker, who is black, plenty of national media attention and a platform to address civil rights, which Democratic groups have flagged as a major concern with respect to Sessions being attorney general.

“He is someone with a demonstrated leadership in civil rights and he feels very strongly about Sen. Sessions’s civil rights record,” said Steve Elmendorf, a Democratic lobbyist and strategist. “We’re in a unique moment here where we have a new president who’s trying to put a bunch of people into office who are extreme.”

“In the face of the extremism, Democrats are going to stand up and say something,” he added.

Republicans, however, say Booker is breaching Senate traditions of comity for the sake of his own his presidential ambitions.

“I’m very disappointed that Sen. Booker has chosen to start his 2020 presidential campaign by testifying against Sen. Sessions,” Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonGOP looks for Plan B after failure of immigration measures Senate rejects Trump immigration plan Our intelligence chiefs just want to tell the truth about national security MORE (R-Ark.) said in a statement posted on Facebook.

He slammed Booker’s testimony as “a disgraceful breach of custom” and questioned his motives by noting that last year the New Jersey legislator said he was “honored” to partner with Sessions on a resolution honoring civil rights activists.

A spokesman for Booker pointed to his boss’s statement from earlier this week: “I do not take lightly the decision to testify against a Senate colleague. … Senator Sessions’ decades-long record is concerning in a number of ways, from his opposition to bipartisan criminal justice reform to his views on bipartisan drug policy reform, from his efforts earlier in his career to deny citizens voting rights to his criticism of the Voting Rights Act, from his failure to defend the civil rights of women, minorities, and LGBT Americans to his opposition to common sense, bipartisan immigration reform.”

Booker is up for reelection in 2020. New Jersey state officials could not be reached for comment at press time on the question of whether Booker can run for the Senate and the White House simultaneously. A Nov. 14 report on NJ.com suggests that Booker would have to choose one.

While Democrats with possible White House ambitions are figuring out how to best position themselves for 2020, it’s a topic they don’t want to discuss publicly.

“I’m not sure that anybody running for president in 2020 is going to tell you in January of 2017,” Murphy told The Hill.

When asked about her interest in running for president, Klobuchar on Tuesday quickly ducked into the Senate Democratic lunch, telling a reporter, “I’ve got to eat food.”

Later she said, “I’m representing Minnesota in the Senate, and we haven’t even sworn in this president.”

“I’m not thinking about that at all,” said Klobuchar, who recently decided against a run for governor.

Elmendorf and other Democratic strategists say the Senate bench of potential presidential candidates is deep, naming Booker, Warren, Klobuchar, Gillibrand, Murphy, Kaine and Brown.

Kaine, however, has said publicly he won’t run in 2020.

Others on the list include Colorado Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetColorado senators pitch immigration compromise Colorado senators mark Olympics with Senate hallway curling GOP Senate candidate fundraising lags behind Dems in key races MORE and Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillMcCaskill welcomes ninth grandson in a row Dem group launches M ad buy to boost vulnerable senators Senate Dems block crackdown on sanctuary cities MORE.

“There are a lot,” Elmendorf said. “I am a big believer that we need younger people, new faces and all of those people as new faces.”

The biggest challenge of these senators — with the exception of Warren, who has a prominent national profile — is the need to raise their name identification with voters and donors outside the Beltway.

“Donald Trump is going to give people a great opportunity to build that profile. If you’re a Democrat, you have a lot of opportunities to show you can stand up to this guy, which people in the party want to see,” Elmendorf added.

A potential complication for senators viewing possible White House runs four years from now is that many of them face reelection in 2018.

Brown, Gillibrand, Klobuchar, McCaskill, Murphy and Warren have to win reelection next year. Brown and McCaskill are running in states that Trump won by healthy margins and may have tough races.

Brown on Tuesday said he is running for a full Senate term in 2018 and is not interested in vying for the Democratic presidential nomination two years later.

“I have no interest. I want to do this,” he told The Hill, referring to his Senate job.

McCaskill said she also plans to serve a full six-year term if reelected next year.

“Yeah, I don’t think that’s a problem,” she said. “I don’t think that’s an issue at all. I’d be more worried about a problem with my family’s health than I would be running for president.”

Democratic strategists, however, say running for Senate reelection in 2018 could serve as a springboard for senators to White House campaigns in 2020 by giving them the chance to reach out to donors around the country.

“George W. Bush won a very impressive election for governor of Texas in 1998 and that very much helped to launch his presidential campaign in 2000,” Devine said.

“Hillary Clinton won reelection in 2006 [to the Senate before the 2008 presidential campaign] and raised a lot of money,” he added. “It really depends on how you do in the campaign.

“Can you win a decisive victory that can demonstrate to people outside your state that you have the capacity to win voters from the other party and independents? Can you raise a lot of resources, not just from within your own state but from around the country?”