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Manchin 'not going to filibuster’ Trump’s Supreme Court nominee

Manchin 'not going to filibuster’ Trump’s Supreme Court nominee

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinPavlich: The claim Trump let the mentally ill get guns is a lie Toomey to introduce bill broadening background checks for firearms Scott Walker backs West Virginia attorney general in GOP Senate primary MORE (W.Va.) says he isn't planning to join calls from fellow Democrats to filibuster President Trump’s forthcoming Supreme Court nominee. 

“I’m not going to filibuster anybody,” Manchin told the conservative Weekly Standard on Tuesday.

Senate Democrats are expected to put up a fight over Trump's pick to fill the Supreme Court vacancy left by Antonin Scalia's death last year.

Republicans need 60 votes to prevent a filibuster, but the GOP only holds 52 seats, meaning they’ll need at least eight Democrats to override a filibuster.

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Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDemocrats now attack internet rules they once embraced Schumer: Trump budget would ‘cripple’ gun background checks Schumer: Senate Republicans' silence 'deafening' on guns, Russia MORE (D-N.Y.) said earlier this month that Democrats would fight “tooth and nail” if Trump’s Supreme Court pick isn’t "bipartisan and mainstream."

Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyGrassley, Dems step up battle over judicial nominees 2020 Dem contenders travel to key primary states Mulvaney remarks on Trump budget plan spark confusion MORE (D-Ore.) also circulated a petition Monday urging colleagues to block any Trump nominee given Senate Republicans' refusal to give a hearing or vote to Merrick Garland, former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaOvernight Energy: Dems ask Pruitt to justify first-class travel | Obama EPA chief says reg rollback won't stand | Ex-adviser expects Trump to eventually rejoin Paris accord Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand Ex-US ambassador: Mueller is the one who is tough on Russia MORE's pick to fill the vacancy last year.

“This is a stolen seat. This is the first time a Senate majority has stolen a seat,” Merkley told Politico. “We will use every lever in our power to stop this. ... I will definitely object to a simple majority.”

The Senate GOP's refusal has left the country’s highest court with only eight justices for nearly a year.

But Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOvernight Health Care: Trump eases rules on insurance outside ObamaCare | HHS office on religious rights gets 300 complaints in a month | GOP chair eyes opioid bill vote by Memorial Day HHS official put on leave amid probe into social media posts Trump, Pence to address CPAC this week MORE (R-Texas) told Politico on Tuesday that Republicans could move to amend Senate rules, changing the 60-vote threshold that the GOP would need to meet to block a filibuster.

"The Democrats are not going to succeed in filibustering the Supreme Court nominee," Cruz said. "All procedural options are on the table. The bottom line is we will confirm a strong conservative to replace Justice Scalia."

Trump is expected to announce his Supreme Court nominee Tuesday night.