GOP promises ‘careful’ review of Yellen

Senate Republicans on Wednesday made it clear Janet Yellen’s confirmation as head of the Federal Reserve will be no cakewalk. [WATCH VIDEO]

While a handful of Republicans praised Yellen, who if confirmed would be the first woman to lead the Fed, others signaled opposition over her economic views, which some believe could lead to inflation.

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“I voted against Vice Chairman Yellen’s original nomination to the Fed in 2010 because of her dovish views on monetary policy,” Sen. Bob CorkerBob CorkerPolicymakers forget duty to protect taxpayers from financial failures Overnight Defense: GOP chairman moves ahead with 0B defense bill | Lawmakers eye 355 ship navy | Senate panel seeks answers on shoot down of Syrian jet Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump tweetstorm on Russia probe | White House reportedly pushing to weaken sanctions bill | Podesta to testify before House Intel MORE (R-Tenn.), a member of the Senate Banking Committee, said in a statement.

“We will closely examine her record since that time, but I am not aware of anything that demonstrates her views have changed,” he added.

A spokesman for Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.), who also serves on the Banking panel, said the lawmaker had “real concerns about her proclivity to print more money and her record as a bank regulator, which has been found wanting.”

Most think Yellen will continue the policies of Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, which could mean a slow tapering off of the Fed’s stimulus for the economy.

Markets had hoped Yellen would get the nod and were mixed on Wednesday despite fears that the U.S. could miss a deadline next week for hiking the debt ceiling, causing a default on government payments.

Republican lawmakers, however, have been worried about some of Bernanke’s actions, and even a Republican who backed Yellen’s nomination to the Fed in 2010 held back on an endorsement Wednesday.

“I will pay careful attention to Ms. Yellen’s views on what role she believes the Fed should play as we continue working to strengthen our economy,” said Sen. Mike JohannsMike JohannsLobbying World To buy a Swiss company, ChemChina must pass through Washington Republican senator vows to block nominees over ObamaCare co-ops MORE (R-Neb.), who backed Yellen in 2010. He noted that the economy is in a “different place” now.

Yellen was confirmed by a voice vote in 2010 to serve as the Fed’s vice chairwoman, and her nomination cleared the Banking panel by a vote of 17-6, garnering the support of four Republicans.

She is expected to win the approval of most Democrats in the Senate, many of whom were pleased Obama picked Yellen over former economic adviser Larry Summers. Yellen is expected to focus on the Fed’s role in lowering unemployment, a position that will help her with liberal lawmakers.

Yet it is possible she could lose a handful of votes from President Obama’s party.

Sen. Heidi HeitkampHeidi HeitkampSenate Dem undecided on 2018 reelection run Trump ‘regulatory czar’: Two-for-one rule can work Congress should just say no to more green energy handouts MORE (D-N.D.), who sits on the Banking Committee, said Wednesday she wants to consider the pick further before making a decision. And Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump: Hillary Clinton colluded with Democrats to defeat Bernie Sanders Sanders: GOP healthcare bill is a 'moral outrage' GOP at decisive moment on Planned Parenthood MORE (I-Vt.), a liberal who caucuses with Democrats, indicated he would press Yellen on a number of fronts, particularly on financial regulation.

Senate Banking Committee Chairman Tim JohnsonTim JohnsonCourt ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada Bank lobbyists counting down to Shelby’s exit Former GOP senator endorses Clinton after Orlando shooting MORE (D-S.D.) said he wants to move Yellen’s nomination in a “timely manner,” but no time frame for a confirmation hearing has yet been set, according to a committee spokesman.

In introducing Yellen on Wednesday, Obama hailed her as “exceptionally well-

qualified” for the job.

“She is a proven leader, and she’s tough. Not just because she’s from Brooklyn,” he said.

Since Yellen joined the Fed, it has ratcheted up its efforts to stimulate the economy, buying hundreds of billions of dollars in bonds in several rounds of “quantitative easing.” Those purchases are still underway, but experts expect the Fed to hit the brakes soon, leaving Yellen with the tough job of navigating the exit without driving down a market buoyed by the easy money policies.

Some Republicans who struck a favorable tone toward Yellen refrained from officially backing her on Wednesday.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsCollins: 'It's hard for me to see the bill passing this week' GOP at decisive moment on Planned Parenthood Sunday shows preview: Senate healthcare debate heats up MORE (R-Maine) called her a “very experienced, qualified individual,” but added she needed to hear more from the nominee.

“I want to wait until I see her performance at her nomination hearing,” said Collins, who is leaning toward supporting Yellen. “You never know what may happen at a confirmation hearing.”

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin HatchLive coverage: Senate GOP unveils its ObamaCare repeal bill Grassley doesn't see how Judiciary 'can avoid' obstruction probe Ryan calls for tax reform to be permanent MORE (R-Utah) called Yellen “impressive.”

“She’s been pretty accurate in her prognostications, which is impressive to me,” he told The Hill.

Jim Pethokoukis, a scholar with the American Enterprise Institute, said there would be a “huge temptation” for any Republicans eyeing a White House run to use Yellen’s nomination to climb onto an anti-Fed soapbox.

“Among the Tea Party and conservative Republicans, there is a very intense anti-Fed feeling,” he said. “It would be very difficult for anyone who plans to run for president to vote for Janet Yellen.”

He said he would discourage such en effort, however, because Yellen is qualified for the job and railing against a historic female pick would “look terrible.”

Likely suspects to mount an anti-Fed campaign over Yellen’s nomination include Sens. Ted CruzTed CruzDem senator: GOP's healthcare approach will 'devastate Medicaid' GOP at decisive moment on Planned Parenthood Trump: ‘I cannot imagine’ GOP senators don’t back healthcare bill MORE (R-Texas) and Rand PaulRand PaulRand Paul: 'If you offer me a 90 percent repeal, I'd probably vote for it' Dem senator: GOP's healthcare approach will 'devastate Medicaid' Price: 'Thin needle to thread' to get lawmakers to support healthcare bill MORE (R-Ky.), whose father literally wrote the book on criticizing the Fed.

But so far, even those Fed firebrands are playing it cool.

“Sen. Paul looks forward to an in-depth discussion about the role and actions of the Federal Reserve while debating this nomination,” a Paul spokesman said.

“One issue at a time. Right now we need to fund vital government functions,” Cruz said when asked about Yellen.


Selim Koru contributed to this report.