Senate Conservatives Fund blasts McConnell for emerging fiscal deal

The Senate Conservatives Fund on Monday slammed Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellLawmakers push one-week stopgap funding bill Overnight Finance: Inside Trump's tax plan | White House mulls order pulling out of NAFTA | New fight over Dodd-Frank begins Dem rep: Trump's tax plan as believable as 'magic, unicorns or Batman' MORE (Ky.) for negotiating a fiscal deal that leaves ObamaCare largely intact. [WATCH VIDEO]

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“Now McConnell is working with Harry ReidHarry ReidDraft House bill ignites new Yucca Mountain fight Week ahead: House to revive Yucca Mountain fight Warren builds her brand with 2020 down the road MORE on a plan to fund Obamacare and raise the debt limit,” said Matt Hoskins, executive director of the Senate Conservatives Fund, in a statement. 

“Not only will this plan force Americans to pay for a law they oppose, it will force them to borrow more money to do it,” he said.

Senate Republicans are expected to hold a conference meeting Tuesday to discuss the emerging deal.

Republicans who vote for it, however, could face critical television ads from the Senate Conservative Fund, which has targeted about a half-dozen GOP senators over the ObamaCare defunding fight in recent months.

“So now Mitch McConnell is negotiating the Republican surrender,” Hoskins said. “He gave the Democrats a blank check back in July when he signaled he would do anything to avoid a shutdown and now Democrats can demand whatever they want. It's humiliating.

“Mitch McConnell has left his party powerless,” Hoskins added.

Hoskins said McConnell pushed GOP colleagues into adopting the “untenable position that all government programs must be funded if they are part of current law.”

He argued Republicans have a constitutional right to protect American taxpayers from having to pay for “misguided programs.”

A spokesman for McConnell did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Senate aides familiar with the emerging deal say it would fund government until Jan. 15 and raise the debt limit until February.

Democrats say it will not include any reforms of the Affordable Care Act unless Republicans give them something in return.

A Senate aide said setting up a process to verify the income claims of people applying for subsidies through the insurance exchanges could be palatable because doing so would merely enforce the existing law.

McConnell announced on Monday that his talks with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (Nev.) have made good progress. 

"We have had an opportunity over the last couple of days to have some very constructive exchanges of views about how to move forward," he said. "I share [the Democratic leader's] optimism that we're going to get a result that will be acceptable to both sides."

The Senate Conservatives Fund has become a divisive force within the Senate GOP conference.

Mainstream Republican senators such as Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteBottom Line How Gorsuch's confirmation shapes the next Supreme Court battle THE MEMO: Trump set to notch needed win with Gorsuch MORE (R-N.H.) and Dan CoatsDan CoatsOvernight Defense: Senators go to White House for North Korea briefing | Admiral takes 'hit' for aircraft carrier mixup | Lawmakers urged to beef up US missile defense Senators get North Korea briefing in unusual WH visit Graham: There are 'no good choices left' with North Korea MORE (R-Ind.) have complained in private meetings about the conservative group’s tactics, according to GOP sources.

It funded $340,000 in critical television ads targeting McConnell in September.

"McConnell is the Senate Republican leader but he refuses to lead on defunding ObamaCare," the narrator in the ad claims.  

Hoskins leveled a similar critique on Monday.

“Republicans no longer have a say because Mitch McConnell won’t let them take a stand when it matters. He's made them Republicans in name only,” he said in his statement.

The Senate Conservatives Fund has also funded ads targeting Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamComey to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee Overnight Defense: US moving missile defense system to South Korea | Dems want justification for Syria strike | Army pick pushes back against critics of LGBT record Graham: There are 'no good choices left' with North Korea MORE (R-S.C.), Thad CochranThad CochranLawmakers push one-week stopgap funding bill Picking 2018 candidates pits McConnell vs. GOP groups Overnight Defense: FBI chief confirms Trump campaign, Russia probe | Senators push for Afghan visas | Problems persist at veterans' suicide hotline MORE (R-Miss.), Richard BurrRichard BurrBurr: US in new Cold War with Russia Senator: No signs of GOP 'slow-walking' Russia investigation GOP senator hits back at criticism of Russia probe MORE (R-N.C.), Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderGroups warn of rural health 'crisis' under ObamaCare repeal Trump’s Army pick faces tough confirmation fight Trump faces risky ObamaCare choice MORE (R-Tenn.), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonGeorgia campaigns keep up pressure ahead of runoff vote Medicare’s coverage decisions need more input from physicians Five takeaways from the Georgia special election MORE (R-Ga.) and Jeff FlakeJeff FlakeTrudeau, Trump speak for second night about US-Canada trade Trump says he may break up 9th Circuit Court after rulings go against him Trump administration weighing order to withdraw from NAFTA MORE (R-Ariz.).