Senate Conservatives Fund blasts McConnell for emerging fiscal deal

The Senate Conservatives Fund on Monday slammed Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellTrump quietly putting his stamp on the courts Democrats see ObamaCare leverage in spending fights OPINION | Progressives, now's your chance to secure healthcare for all MORE (Ky.) for negotiating a fiscal deal that leaves ObamaCare largely intact. [WATCH VIDEO]

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“Now McConnell is working with Harry ReidHarry ReidOPINION | 5 ways Democrats can win back power in the states THE MEMO: Trump's base cheers attacks on McConnell It's time for McConnell to fight with Trump instead of against him MORE on a plan to fund Obamacare and raise the debt limit,” said Matt Hoskins, executive director of the Senate Conservatives Fund, in a statement. 

“Not only will this plan force Americans to pay for a law they oppose, it will force them to borrow more money to do it,” he said.

Senate Republicans are expected to hold a conference meeting Tuesday to discuss the emerging deal.

Republicans who vote for it, however, could face critical television ads from the Senate Conservative Fund, which has targeted about a half-dozen GOP senators over the ObamaCare defunding fight in recent months.

“So now Mitch McConnell is negotiating the Republican surrender,” Hoskins said. “He gave the Democrats a blank check back in July when he signaled he would do anything to avoid a shutdown and now Democrats can demand whatever they want. It's humiliating.

“Mitch McConnell has left his party powerless,” Hoskins added.

Hoskins said McConnell pushed GOP colleagues into adopting the “untenable position that all government programs must be funded if they are part of current law.”

He argued Republicans have a constitutional right to protect American taxpayers from having to pay for “misguided programs.”

A spokesman for McConnell did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Senate aides familiar with the emerging deal say it would fund government until Jan. 15 and raise the debt limit until February.

Democrats say it will not include any reforms of the Affordable Care Act unless Republicans give them something in return.

A Senate aide said setting up a process to verify the income claims of people applying for subsidies through the insurance exchanges could be palatable because doing so would merely enforce the existing law.

McConnell announced on Monday that his talks with Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (Nev.) have made good progress. 

"We have had an opportunity over the last couple of days to have some very constructive exchanges of views about how to move forward," he said. "I share [the Democratic leader's] optimism that we're going to get a result that will be acceptable to both sides."

The Senate Conservatives Fund has become a divisive force within the Senate GOP conference.

Mainstream Republican senators such as Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteRNC chair warns: Republicans who refused to back Trump offer 'cautionary tale' OPINION: Democracy will send ISIS to the same grave as communism Kelly Ayotte joins defense contractor's board of directors MORE (R-N.H.) and Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsThe Hill's 12:30 Report DOJ warns the media could be targeted in crackdown on leaks Conway: Leaks of Trump's calls should have 'chilling effect' MORE (R-Ind.) have complained in private meetings about the conservative group’s tactics, according to GOP sources.

It funded $340,000 in critical television ads targeting McConnell in September.

"McConnell is the Senate Republican leader but he refuses to lead on defunding ObamaCare," the narrator in the ad claims.  

Hoskins leveled a similar critique on Monday.

“Republicans no longer have a say because Mitch McConnell won’t let them take a stand when it matters. He's made them Republicans in name only,” he said in his statement.

The Senate Conservatives Fund has also funded ads targeting Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamTrump's Charlottesville comments push North Korea from spotlight 'Dreamers' deadline looms for Trump Graham: Trump must do more to distance himself from white supremacists MORE (R-S.C.), Thad CochranThad CochranGOP senators ask Trump to hold off on Venezuelan oil sanctions Both sides of the aisle agree — telemedicine is the future Overnight Finance: GOP offers measure to repeal arbitration rule | Feds fine Exxon M for Russian sanctions violations | Senate panel sticks with 2017 funding levels for budget | Trump tax nominee advances | Trump unveils first reg agenda MORE (R-Miss.), Richard BurrRichard BurrSenate chairman hopes to wrap up Russia investigation this year Lawmakers seek to interview Trump secretary in Russia probe Senate Dem wants closer look at Russia's fake news operation on Facebook MORE (R-N.C.), Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderCBO to release report Tuesday on ending ObamaCare insurer payments OPINION | Progressives, now's your chance to secure healthcare for all Insurers cite uncertainty in filing ObamaCare rate hikes MORE (R-Tenn.), Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonTrump signs Veterans Affairs bill at New Jersey golf club No. 2 Senate Republican backs McConnell in Trump fight Savings through success in foreign assistance MORE (R-Ga.) and Jeff FlakeJeff FlakeChallenger’s super PAC accuses Flake of betraying voters in new ad Dems target Flake's seat amid GOP infighting Republican lawmakers criticize Trump response to Charlottesville MORE (R-Ariz.).