Senate GOP invites female senator to healthcare group after criticism

Senate GOP invites female senator to healthcare group after criticism
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Senate Republican leaders invited Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Moore CapitoNo. 2 Senate Republican backs McConnell in Trump fight The fight to protect the Affordable Care Act isn’t over Will Congress preserve monopoly power for healthcare lobbyists? MORE (R-W.Va.) Tuesday to participate in a meeting of a special working group on healthcare reform after being criticized for not initially including a woman in the 13-member group.

It's not clear whether Capito will join the group permanently.

Capito told reporters she had been invited to Tuesday’s session but wasn’t certain whether she would be a full-time member.

“I don’t know,” she said, when asked about her status going forward.

“We’re going to be talking about Medicaid; that’s the issue I’m concerned about,” Capito, whose state accepted ObamaCare's Medicaid expansion, added.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellTrump quietly putting his stamp on the courts Democrats see ObamaCare leverage in spending fights OPINION | Progressives, now's your chance to secure healthcare for all MORE (R-Ky.) has put the group together to forge legislation to repeal and replace parts of ObamaCare.

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The group, however, did not initially include a woman, stirring controversy in the media and criticism from Democrats because the House healthcare bill passed last week includes a number of provisions affecting women’s health, such as language defunding Planned Parenthood for a year.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan CollinsNo. 2 Senate Republican backs McConnell in Trump fight The fight to protect the Affordable Care Act isn’t over The real litmus test is whether pro-life democrats vote for pro-life legislation MORE (R-Maine), who has voiced concerns about efforts to defund Planned Parenthood and has sponsored an alternative bill to repeal ObamaCare in states that opt to, says she will continue to work on healthcare issues separately from the group.