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GOP debates tax cuts vs. tax reform

GOP debates tax cuts vs. tax reform
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Republicans are looking for fast action on tax cuts after burning up President Trump’s first 200 days in office without any major legislative accomplishments.

The problem? Lawmakers remain divided over how to move forward with tax reform and have yet to pass a budget that would unlock a fast-track process for preventing Democrats from filibustering their legislation.

The stakes for the GOP are enormous.

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Trump’s approval rating is at a record low for this stage of a presidency, and GOP lawmakers face pressure to score a big win before the 2018 midterm elections.

“It’s critical,” said Republican strategist Vin Weber. "We’re in danger of the notion that Republicans can’t govern the country being set in people’s minds and becoming very difficult to dislodge."

“Action before the end of the year, that’s the time I would use, seems to me to be really, really important,” he added.

The biggest problem for Republicans is agreeing on the scope of their potential tax package.

An increasing number of Republicans want to scale back the goal of comprehensive tax reform in favor of the narrower goal of tax cuts.

They want to find what is readily achievable and move forward quickly, before it becomes more difficult to pass legislation in a midterm election year.

GOP lawmakers fear losing momentum by becoming bogged down in a complex and controversial negotiation over closing tax credits and loopholes, which would draw pushback from various special interests.

“I would like to set a goal of trying to get done as soon as we can and by then would be a good goal,” Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoSenate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA Dems rip Trump's Fed pick as Senate panel mulls three key nominees Trump calls for looser rules for bank loans in Dodd-Frank overhaul MORE (R-Idaho), a senior member of the Senate Finance Committee, said of the Thanksgiving timeline.

“It’s a desire to get as much work as we can in before the year ends,” he added.

Former Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) has made this argument in public and in private meetings with GOP lawmakers.

Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchOvernight Tech: Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up hack | Apple considers battery rebates | Regulators talk bitcoin | SpaceX launches world's most powerful rocket Overnight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach Hatch introduces bipartisan bill to clarify cross-border data policies MORE (R-Utah) also wants to move a tax package quickly, as do GOP Sens. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntHouse passes bill to ease menu labeling rules under ObamaCare Heroin Task Force presses Congress for more funding to fight opioid epidemic Senate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA MORE (Mo.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerMcConnell urging Mississippi gov to appoint himself if Cochran resigns: report Senate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA Trump, GOP make peace after tax win — but will it last? MORE (Miss.), two Republicans close to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDems confront Kelly after he calls some immigrants 'lazy' McConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Overnight Defense: Latest on spending fight - House passes stopgap with defense money while Senate nears two-year budget deal | Pentagon planning military parade for Trump | Afghan war will cost B in 2018 MORE (R-Ky.).

“If you’re going to get them done they got to be done about that time because you then get into some very perilous times after that and a lot of slowdowns after that,” Hatch told The Hill of a November timeline.

Not everyone is ready to move on from tax reform, however.

A spokeswoman for Hatch said that while he wants to take action this fall, he has consistently called for comprehensive tax reform and isn’t ready to give up on the possibility.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMcConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Overnight Defense: Latest on spending fight - House passes stopgap with defense money while Senate nears two-year budget deal | Pentagon planning military parade for Trump | Afghan war will cost B in 2018 House passes stopgap spending measure with defense money MORE (R-Wis.) backs a comprehensive restructuring of the tax code, as does the White House.

Ryan promoted tax reform at a town hall meeting in Burlington, Wis., on Friday, setting a fall timeline for action.

“We’re not going to allow the setback in the Senate on healthcare to knock us off track with our plans for tax reform in the fall,” he told constituents.

Some members of the Senate Finance Committee also want a more ambitious tax reform package — something Congress hasn’t passed since 1986.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneOvernight Tech: Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up hack | Apple considers battery rebates | Regulators talk bitcoin | SpaceX launches world's most powerful rocket Apple tells senator it may give rebates to consumers who bought iPhone batteries Republican agenda clouded by division MORE (R-S.D.), a member of the Finance panel, argued that some more ambitious changes need to be considered, such as a moving to a territorial system that would not tax corporate profits earned overseas. 

“An issue that has favor of some of our members is doing something smaller, just an individual rate cut and push the other stuff until later, but I don’t think we want to give up on comprehensive [reform],” Thune said.

“My goal is to do a big bold reform bill. I know there are some advocates out there for just doing something small and kind of incremental, but that doesn’t solve most of our problems,” he said.

Republicans also must get a budget passed to move to tax reform.

House Republicans have been divided over the budget and were unable to agree to a measure before leaving for the August recess. The Senate also has yet to do a budget.

Republicans need a blueprint for tax reform because it would allow them to pass tax legislation through the Senate on a majority vote, preventing a Democratic filibuster. Republicans used the same rules in their failed effort to pass ObamaCare repeal legislation.

The House has yet to pass a budget resolution because of tensions between the GOP leadership and the conservative House Freedom Caucus, which wants deeper cuts to mandatory spending than the pending budget draft calls for.

House conservatives also want tighter guidelines for tax reform after they felt burned by the evolution of the ObamaCare repeal legislation.

Another problem for lawmakers seeking quick action is the congressional schedule.

When lawmakers return, they will face deadlines to fund the government and raise the nation’s debt ceiling by the end of the month. These discussions are likely to dominate the agenda in September.

Congress also faces an end-of-September deadline to finish work legislation to reauthorize the Children’s Health Insurance Program — a program under the Finance panel’s jurisdiction.

The panel is not expected to mark up tax legislation next month, and given the unfinished work on the debt ceiling and appropriations bills, it may be difficult to pass a budget by the end of September.