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Senate plans hearing for bills to protect Mueller

Senate plans hearing for bills to protect Mueller
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The Senate Judiciary Committee is planning hearings for legislation that would protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller from being fired by President TrumpDonald John TrumpTillerson: Russia already looking to interfere in 2018 midterms Dems pick up deep-red legislative seat in Missouri Speier on Trump's desire for military parade: 'We have a Napoleon in the making' MORE.

There are currently two sets of bipartisan bills aimed at protecting Mueller. The first bill is being introduced by Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisSenate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA McConnell: Mueller needs 'no protection' from Trump Press: Congress must protect Mueller from Trump MORE (R-N.C.) and Sen. Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsOvernight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach Hatch bill would dramatically increase H-1B visas Live coverage: Shutdown begins MORE (D-Del.), and would only allow the most senior Justice Department official to fire Mueller. 

 

The second bill, introduced by Sen. Corey Booker (D-N.J.) and Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMcConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Overnight Tech: Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up hack | Apple considers battery rebates | Regulators talk bitcoin | SpaceX launches world's most powerful rocket Overnight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach MORE (R-S.C.), would protect Mueller from being fired unless the attorney general tells a three-judge panel that there was "misconduct, dereliction of duty, incapacity, conflict of interest or other good cause," according to CNN.

Tillis told CNN he was informed that the committee plans on to hold hearings on the legislation in the next two weeks, and that the committee's Chairman, Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach Overnight Finance: Senators near two-year budget deal | Trump would 'love to see a shutdown' over immigration | Dow closes nearly 600 points higher after volatile day | Trade deficit at highest level since 2008 | Pawlenty leaving Wall Street group Grassley to Sessions: Policy for employees does not comply with the law MORE (R-Iowa.), has not dismissed calling the bill up for a vote. 

The development is a sign that the committee would be willing to go against Trump if he called to remove Mueller. 

The Trump administration has expressed great displeasure if Mueller's probe, often citing his staff's ties to Democratic campaigns. The president also publicly warned Mueller not to probe his finances in an interview last July.

It has since been reported that Mueller is looking at Trump's financial history as part of the probe into Russian election interference.

The Senate Judiciary Committee recently set its sights on the president's son, Donald Trump Jr., following reports of his 2016 meeting with a Russian attorney. 

The younger Trump met with Senate staffers for more than five hours last week, in which he said he accepted a meeting with a Russian lawyer promising dirt on Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonTrump touts report Warner attempted to talk to dossier author Poll: Nearly half of Iowans wouldn’t vote for Trump in 2020 Rubio on Warner contact with Russian lobbyist: It’s ‘had zero impact on our work’ MORE because he wanted to assess her “fitness” for office.