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Grassley: 'Good chance' Senate panel will consider bills to protect Mueller

Grassley: 'Good chance' Senate panel will consider bills to protect Mueller
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Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach Overnight Finance: Senators near two-year budget deal | Trump would 'love to see a shutdown' over immigration | Dow closes nearly 600 points higher after volatile day | Trade deficit at highest level since 2008 | Pawlenty leaving Wall Street group Grassley to Sessions: Policy for employees does not comply with the law MORE (R-Iowa) signaled on Monday that his committee could take up two bills aimed at protecting Robert Mueller, the special counsel for the investigation into potential ties between President Trump's campaign and Russia. 

"We're looking into it, and there's a good chance we'll have a hearing," Grassley, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, told reporters.  

He added that no decision has been made on scheduling a hearing.  

Lawmakers have introduced two bills that would put checks on the Trump administration's ability to fire Mueller. 

One, from GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham (S.C.) and Democratic Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerUndiagnosed sleep apnea cause of two rail crashes: NTSB WATCH: Dems say Trump will look like he has something to hide if he avoids Muller interview Protecting the special counsel is an American duty MORE (N.J.), would require a judge to approve a Justice Department request to fire Mueller or any other special counsel. 

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Another, from GOP Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisSenate Republicans call on Trump to preserve NAFTA McConnell: Mueller needs 'no protection' from Trump Press: Congress must protect Mueller from Trump MORE (N.C.) and Democratic Sen. Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsOvernight Cybersecurity: Tillerson proposes new cyber bureau at State | Senate bill would clarify cross-border data rules | Uber exec says 'no justification' for covering up breach Hatch bill would dramatically increase H-1B visas Live coverage: Shutdown begins MORE (Del.), would let Mueller or any special counsel challenge their firing in court.

Tillis told CNN last week that the Judiciary Committee would hold a hearing in the next two weeks.  

The Judiciary Committee is currently running an investigation into interference in the 2016 election, potential attempts by the Obama or Trump Departments of Justice to interfere in FBI investigations and the firing of former FBI Director James Comey.

Trump and his allies have lashed out at Mueller, who is probing Russia's interference in the 2016 election and any ties to the Trump campaign. The war of words has raised concern that Trump or the Justice Department could try to fire Mueller.