Senate panel to hold hearing on bump stocks, background checks

Senate panel to hold hearing on bump stocks, background checks
© Greg Nash

The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a hearing on rules regulating firearm accessories and the national background check system in the wake of mass shootings in Texas and Las Vegas. 

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyPruitt’s new problem with the GOP: Ethanol Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Dems see midterm advantage in new ObamaCare fight Senate Judiciary urges response to sexual harassment in federal courts MORE's (R-Iowa) office announced on Tuesday that they will hold a hearing in one week on "firearm accessory regulation and enforcing federal and state reporting to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS)."

The formal announcement comes after a spokesman for the Iowa Republican told The Hill on Monday that the Senate panel would hold a hearing on bump stocks, a device that can simulate automatic gunfire with a semi-automatic weapon.

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Lawmakers have honed in on bump stocks after a mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas, where nearly 60 people were killed and more than 500 others were injured. 

Authorities have said a dozen of the rifles used by the suspect, 64-year-old Stephen Paddock, had been modified with bump stocks.

Meanwhile, senators are also mulling legislation to try to strengthen NICS in the wake of this week's shooting at First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas.

Devin Kelley, the identified gunman, received a “bad conduct” discharge from the Air Force after being court-martialed on a domestic violence charge. Kelley’s court-martial conviction should have been reported to the FBI’s database and could have made it harder for him to purchase a gun legally.

But Air Force officials on Monday said the Holloman Air Force Base Office of Special Investigation did not enter Kelley’s information into the system.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynMcConnell: Mueller 'ought to wrap it up' Senate rejects effort to boost Congress's national security oversight Graham jokes about Corker: GOP would have to be organized to be a cult MORE (R-Texas), a member of the Judiciary Committee, said earlier Tuesday that he will introduce legislation to strengthen information sharing with NICS.

And Sens. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) and Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichOvernight Energy: DNC to reject fossil fuel donations | Regulators see no security risk in coal plant closures | Senate committee rejects Trump EPA, Interior budgets Energy commission sees no national security risk from coal plant closures The Hill's Morning Report — Trump: `A very great moment in the history of the world’ MORE (D-N.M.) are working on legislation to require that the military report domestic violence convictions to the national background check system.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainDonald Trump is delivering on his promises and voters are noticing The Memo: Trump’s media game puts press on back foot Meghan McCain shreds Giuliani for calling Biden a 'mentally deficient idiot' MORE (R-Ariz.), chairman of the Armed Services Committee, separately told reporters that he will hold a hearing on the Air Force's failure to report the conviction to the background check system, according to Stars and Stripes.