Warner doesn't dismiss public hearing for Trump Jr.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank Comey back in the spotlight after Flynn makes a deal Warner: Every week another shoe drops in Russia investigation MORE (D-Va.), the vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said there were still questions that needed to be answered by Donald Trump Jr. and other figures in the Trump administration concerning the ongoing probe into Russia interference in the 2016 presidential election. 

"There are still a number of individuals. I mean, Michael Cohen, Mr. Trump's lawyer, we want to bring him back. We want to bring Donald Trump Jr. in. He's not testified yet," Warner told MSNBC's Kasie Hunt on Sunday. 

When asked whether he wanted Trump Jr. to testify publicly, Warner didn't rule out the possibility.

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"Some of these individuals, particularly Mr. Trump Jr., who's not part of the government, we got to give a chance to have folks hear his side of the story. I still believe we need to have Mr. Kushner back before the whole committee," Warner said. 

The senator's comments come amid ongoing federal and congressional probes into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

The president's eldest son came under scrutiny when it was revealed he had agreed to take part in an interview with Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya at Trump Tower in June of 2016 in order to get "dirt" on then-Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP lawmakers cite new allegations of political bias in FBI Top intel Dem: Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about Trump Tower discussions with father MORE

Trump Jr. took part in a marathon five-hour interview with the committee behind closed doors in September. 

He insisted during the interview that he had the intention of speaking to his lawyers before using any of the information.

"There are a lot of areas that have been opened for future witnesses and questioning,” Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), who was present for parts of the interview, said. “There will be a lot of areas to be pursued.”