Senate ethics panel resumes Menendez probe after judge declares mistrial

Senate ethics panel resumes Menendez probe after judge declares mistrial
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The Senate Ethics Committee said Thursday that it will resume its probe into Sen. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezThe Hill's Morning Report: Can Trump close the deal with North Korea? Senate must save itself by confirming Mike Pompeo Poll: Menendez has 17-point lead over GOP challenger MORE (D-N.J.) after his bribery and corruption case ended in a mistrial.

"In 2012, the committee initiated a preliminary inquiry into alleged misconduct by Senator Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezThe Hill's Morning Report: Can Trump close the deal with North Korea? Senate must save itself by confirming Mike Pompeo Poll: Menendez has 17-point lead over GOP challenger MORE. In early 2013, consistent with its precedent and in consideration of the Department of Justice's criminal investigation, the committee deferred its inquiry. At this time, the committee intends to resume its process," the committee said.

Ethics Committee Chairman Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by CVS Health - A pivotal day for House Republicans on immigration GOP, Dem lawmakers come together for McCain documentary Not only do we need to support veterans, but their caregivers, too MORE (R-Ga.), Vice Chairman Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsCongress, Trump eye new agency to invest in projects overseas On World Press Freedom Day, elected officials must commit to keeping press freedom nonpartisan Overnight Defense: Pompeo clears Senate panel, on track for confirmation | Retired officers oppose Haspel for CIA director | Iran, Syria on agenda for Macron visit MORE (D-Del.) and Sens. Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischHouse passes bill to help small businesses guard against hackers Menendez admonished by Ethics panel, which says he broke the law GOP anxiety grows over Trump’s Iran decision MORE (R-Idaho), Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSinger Jason Mraz: Too much political 'combat' in Washington Trump gives GOP midterm pep talk The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Pfizer — Trump, Kim summit set for June 12 in Singapore MORE (R-Kan.), Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzDemocratic senator: Trump Jr. meeting with Gulf emissary 'absolutely crazy' Hillicon Valley: Senate votes to save net neutrality | Senate panel breaks with House, says Russia favored Trump in 2016 | Latest from Cambridge Analytica whistleblower | Lawmakers push back on helping Chinese tech giant Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Trump official won't OK lifetime limits on Medicaid MORE (D-Hawaii) and Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenJudd Gregg: 'Medicare for all' means rationing for everyone The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by CVS Health - A pivotal day for House Republicans on immigration Overnight Defense: Senate confirms Haspel as CIA chief | Trump offers Kim 'protections' if he gives up nukes | Dem amendments target Trump military parade MORE (D-N.H.) issued the announcement in a joint statement.

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They noted that the committee would not make additional public statements about its probe "except in accordance with committee rules."

The announcement comes after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump's plan to claw back spending hits wall in Congress GOP lawmakers want Trump to stop bashing Congress Parkland father calls out Trump, McConnell, Ryan after Santa Fe shooting MORE (R-Ky.) publicly called on the ethics panel to immediately investigate Menendez following the mistrial.

"His trial shed light on serious accusations of violating the public’s trust as an elected official, as well as potential violations of the Senate’s Code of Conduct," McConnell said.

Menendez's bribery and corruption case ended with the judge declaring a mistrial on Thursday after jurors were unable to come to a consensus on the felony charges after days of deliberating.

The decision is largely considered a win for Menendez, with 10 jurors favoring acquitting him on the charges, while two did not.