The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill

Senate Republicans are poised to pass a massive tax-reform plan.

Leaders had hoped to pass the bill this week but momentum stalled Thursday night with a handful of GOP senators pushing for changes to address the bill's impact on the deficit and its treatment of so-called pass through businesses.

But changes to the bill won support from Sens. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonOvernight Cybersecurity: Panel pushes agencies on dropping Kaspersky software | NC county won't pay ransom to hackers | Lawmakers sound alarm over ISIS 'cyber caliphate' GOP chairman warns of ISIS's ‘cyber caliphate’ Overnight Finance: House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama | GOP leaders to consider Dec. 30 spending bill | Justices skeptical of ban on sports betting | Mulvaney won't fire official who sued him MORE (R-Wis.) and Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesOvernight Finance: House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama | GOP leaders to consider Dec. 30 spending bill | Justices skeptical of ban on sports betting | Mulvaney won't fire official who sued him Week ahead: House scrambles on spending bill | What's next on tax reform | Panel to vote on Fed chair nominee This is a tax bill, not tax reform MORE (R-Mont.) who wanted better treatment for businesses that are not corporations.

Another proposal being considered would reduce the size of the $1.4 trillion tax package by $350 billion to win over Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerFormer Dem Tenn. gov to launch Senate bid: report McConnell 'almost certain' GOP will pass tax reform Former New Mexico gov: Trump's foreign policy is getting 'criticized by everybody' MORE (R-Tenn.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeGOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat Sasse: RNC help for Roy Moore 'doesn't make any sense' Sasse calls RNC decision to resume support for Moore 'bad' and 'sad' MORE (R-Ariz.), who have concerns about the deficit. But that change is not popular with House conservatives.

Early Friday afternoon, Flake said he was "pleased to announce" he could support the legislation in its current form, appearing to give Republicans their necessary 50 votes.

Corker is the lone Republican to oppose the bill.

Once it clears the Senate, lawmakers would then have to reconcile it with the House tax-reform package, which has key differences, and pass it through both chambers before delivery to the White House by year's end.

Here is a look at how the votes are stacking up.

The Hill will be updating this list. Send updates to mmali@thehill.com.

This list was last updated on Dec. 1 at 5:01 p.m. Latest updates: Sens. Bob Corker (Tenn.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Health Care: 3.6M signed up for ObamaCare in first month | Ryan pledges 'entitlement reform' next year | Dems push for more money to fight opioids Study: ObamaCare bills backed by Collins would lower premiums Right scrambles GOP budget strategy MORE (Maine) Jeff Flake (Ariz.), Ron Johnson (Wis.), and Steve Daines (Mont.).

 

No (1)

Sen. Bob Corker (Tenn.) — Corker wanted a "trigger" that would raise taxes if revenue projections fell short, but that proposal failed to meet Senate rules. Leaders floated but eventually rejected an offer to scale back the cuts by hundreds of billions of dollars. “This is yet another tough vote. I am disappointed. I wanted to get to 'yes.' But at the end of the day, I am not able to cast aside my fiscal concerns and vote for legislation that I believe, based on the information I currently have, could deepen the debt burden on future generations," Corker said in a statement Friday.

 

Likely yes (8)

Sen. Tom CottonTom CottonGOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration Grassley offers DACA fix tied to tough enforcement measures Five things senators should ask Tom Cotton if he’s nominated to lead the CIA MORE (Ark.) — Cotton is likely a "yes" vote. "Every income group under the Senate bill will see a tax cut," Cotton told CBS News's "Face the Nation."

Sen. Deb FischerDebra (Deb) Strobel FischerUS trade deficit rises on record imports from China Flake, GOP senators to meet with Trump on trade Senate nixes provision boosting conservative college after uproar MORE (Neb.) — Fischer is a likely "yes" vote.

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordGOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration Grassley offers DACA fix tied to tough enforcement measures We are running out of time to protect Dreamers MORE (Okla.) — Lankford said Wednesday he would back the bill if it includes a "backstop" that would raise rates if revenue fails to meet expectations. “So yes, I am on board with this bill because I want to see the good economic growth that’s coming with it, but I also want to make sure we’re protecting future taxpayers as well in debt and deficit,” he told "CBS This Morning."

Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSupreme Court takes on same-sex wedding cake case House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama Trump really will shrink government, starting with national monuments MORE (Utah) — Lee is seeking an increase in the child tax credit and is introducing an amendment on that issue with Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioRyan pledges 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Richard Gere welcomes lawmakers' words of support for Tibet Dem lawmaker gives McConnell's tax reform op-ed a failing grade MORE (R-Fla.).

Sen. Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranMcConnell works to salvage tax bill GOP in furious push for tax-reform votes Overnight Tech: Lawmakers want answers on Uber breach | Justices divided in patent case | Tech makes plea for net neutrality on Cyber Monday MORE (Kan.) — Moran told Fox News on Tuesday he "expects to vote 'yes.' " Moran previously raised concerns about the repeal of the individual mandate and the bill's impact on the deficit.

Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.) — Rubio is seeking an increase in the child tax credit with Sen. Mike Lee (Utah).

Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSasse: RNC help for Roy Moore 'doesn't make any sense' Sasse calls RNC decision to resume support for Moore 'bad' and 'sad' GOP senator: Flake donation to Alabama Dem 'a bad idea' MORE (Neb.) — Sasse is a likely "yes" vote.

Sen. Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungThe Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill Republican senators wrestle with their Roy Moore problem GOP mobilizes against Moore MORE (Ind.) — "I am highly probable to vote for this," Young told The Indianapolis Star on Wednesday. "Of course, it’s subject to an amendment process on the floor. I still need to take a look at what sort of amendments are offered. But I’m pleased with the work product."

 

Yes (43)

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOvernight Finance: Trump says shutdown 'could happen' | Ryan, conservatives inch closer to spending deal | Senate approves motion to go to tax conference | Ryan promises 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Senate approves motion to go to tax conference House conservatives, Ryan inch closer toward spending deal MORE (Tenn.) — Alexander told USA Today he supports the tax plan and using it to repeal the individual mandate.

Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoScalise: House, Senate ‘pretty close’ on tax bill Top GOP senator: House and Senate 'not that far apart' on tax bill Sunday shows preview: Republicans take victory lap on taxes MORE (Wyo.) — Barrasso told Fox News the Senate GOP tax bill would create a "simpler, fairer" tax system.

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntDems push for more money for opioid fight Trump asked Senate Republicans to end Russia election interference investigation: report An overlooked solution to the opioid epidemic MORE (Mo.) — Blunt told NBC's "Meet the Press" that "we've had eight years of economic stagnation for hardworking families and this tax bill, I think, creates the opportunity to move dramatically beyond that."

Sen. John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanThe Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill Lobbying World The Hill's Whip List: Republicans try again on ObamaCare repeal MORE (Ark.) — Boozman voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrSessions argued presidents can obstruct justice in Clinton impeachment trial Trump Jr. to meet with Senate panel amid Russia probe Trump’s Russian winter grows colder with Flynn plea deal MORE (N.C.) — Burr voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoSenate women: Rules on harassment must change Congress, here's a CO2-smart tax fix to protect, create jobs Women, Dems leading sexual harassment discussion in Congress: analysis MORE (W.Va.) — “For West Virginians and so many Americans across the country, the status quo just isn’t working, and this is our opportunity to change it,” Capito said in a statement.

Sen. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyTax bill could fuel push for Medicare, Social Security cuts Collins to vote for GOP tax plan Overnight Tech: Lawmakers want answers on Uber breach | Justices divided in patent case | Tech makes plea for net neutrality on Cyber Monday MORE (La.) — Cassidy said in a floor speech that under the Senate tax bill his constituents “will increase their take-home pay, they'll have higher wages, they will have a better life.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee. 

Sen. Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranObstruction of justice watch: Trump attacks the FBI America isn't ready to let Sessions off his leash The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill MORE (Miss.) — Cochran said in a statement that he is "optimistic about the potential for this legislation to increase economic opportunity and help Mississippi families keep more of their take-home pay.”

Sen. Susan Collins (Maine) — Collins said Friday she would vote for the bill after securing changes to the state and local property tax deduction, a measure to help those with high health-care costs and efforts to shore up ObamaCare markets.

Sen. John CornynJohn CornynMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Air Force makes criminal reporting changes after Texas massacre We need a better pathway for allowing civilians to move guns across state lines MORE (Texas) — The No. 2 Republican in the chamber said in a floor speech that the Senate framework “is designed to cut taxes for middle-class families, not millionaires. It's to help small businesses grow and create more jobs. It's to provide relief for hardworking families by increasing the standard deduction.” Cornyn voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoOvernight Regulation: Feds push to clarify regs on bump stocks | Interior wants Trump to shrink two more monuments | Navajo Nation sues over monument rollback | FCC won't delay net neutrality vote | Senate panel approves bill easing Dodd-Frank rules Overnight Finance: GOP delays work on funding bill amid conservative demands | Senate panel approves Fed nominee Powell | Dodd-Frank rollback advances | WH disputes report Mueller subpoenaed Trump bank records Senate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-Frank MORE (Idaho) — Crapo voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and on the Budget Committee.

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzDebbie Wasserman Schultz marks 10 years as breast cancer survivor Foreign agent registration is no magical shield against Russian propaganda Let Trump be Trump and he'll sail through 2020 MORE (Texas) — Cruz defended the bill during a CNN town hall Tuesday night. "If you're a taxpayer, this bill benefits you," he said.

Sen. Steve Daines (Mont.) — Daines initally came out against the tax bill over concerns it unfairly favored corporations. But on Friday, Daines said he was a "yes" after winning more favorable treatment for pass-through businesses.

Sen. Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Live coverage: Senate Republicans pass tax bill The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill MORE (Wyo.) — Enzi said in a statement that the legislation “will help grow the economy, create more jobs and raise wages. I look forward to working with my colleagues to help pass tax relief to not only benefit hardworking Americans, but make our economy and country stronger.”  He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and as chairman of the Budget Committee.

Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstThanks to the farm lobby, the US is stuck with a broken ethanol policy US trade deficit rises on record imports from China Flake, GOP senators to meet with Trump on trade MORE (Iowa) — "It is long overdue for our country to pursue a simpler tax code that provides much-needed relief for hardworking Iowans that puts our economy back on track," Ernst wrote in an op-ed for the Des Moines Register.

Sen. Jeff Flake (Ariz.)  Flake released a statement just after noon Friday saying he had "secured" his "objectives" from negotiations and would be voting in favor of the legislation.

Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerDems look to use Moore against GOP McConnell: 'No change of heart' on Roy Moore US trade deficit rises on record imports from China MORE (Colo.) — Gardner voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration We are running out of time to protect Dreamers US trade deficit rises on record imports from China MORE (S.C.) — Graham voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGrassley blasts Democrats over unwillingness to probe Clinton GOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration Thanks to the farm lobby, the US is stuck with a broken ethanol policy MORE (Iowa) — Grassley said in a statement that the bill “takes a giant step forward to make our tax code simpler, fairer and more competitive.” He voted for the bill on the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Ryan pledges 'entitlement reform' in 2018 Utah governor calls Bannon a 'bigot' after attacks on Romney MORE (Utah) — Hatch is the Finance Committee Chairman and one of the architects of the bill.

Sen. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerDems look to use Moore against GOP Senate hearing shows Fed chair nominee acts the part Senate GOP votes to begin debate on tax bill MORE (Nev.) — Heller voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee. He is considered the most vulnerable GOP senator up for reelection in 2018.

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenMcConnell works to salvage tax bill GOP to reduce tax relief by 0B to win over deficit hawks  The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill MORE (N.D.) — Hoeven said in a statement that “the Senate tax relief draft lowers rates for individuals and small businesses, including our farmers and ranchers, which is good for North Dakota and good for our nation.”

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeGOP senator on backing Moore: ‘It’s a numbers game’ Overnight Energy: Panel advances controversial Trump nominee | Ex-coal boss Blankenship to run for Senate | Dem commissioner joins energy regulator Senate panel advances controversial environmental nominee MORE (Okla.) — Inhofe told The Oklahoman that he supports the Senate tax bill even if it increased the debt. 

Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonSenate ethics panel wants details on sexual harassment allegations Senate leaders push tax debate into Friday Senate Ethics Committee opens 'preliminary inquiry' into Franken allegations MORE (Ga.) — Isakson said the tax package “will simplify our broken tax code and show the world that the United States will again be a world-class competitor in the global marketplace.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Ron Johnson (Wis.) — Johnson initially opposed the bill but is a "yes" after winning changes on how the bill treats small businesses and pass-through entities.

Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.) — Kennedy voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat Meghan McCain knocks Bannon: 'Who the hell are you' to criticize Romney? Dems demand Tillerson end State hiring freeze, consult with Congress MORE (Ariz.) — “After careful thought and consideration, I have decided to support the Senate tax reform bill," McCain said in a statement Thursday. "I believe this legislation, though far from perfect, would enhance American competitiveness, boost the economy, and provide long overdue tax relief for middle class families." McCain said he understood concerns about the deficit but the "bill's net effect on our economy would be positive."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat McConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Brent Budowsky: A plea to Alabama voters MORE (Ky.)

Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Week ahead: Trump expected to shrink two national monuments GOP on verge of opening Arctic refuge to drilling MORE (Alaska) — Murkowski is a "yes," according to MSNBC. The tax bill will also be tied to a measure that would allow drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a longtime priority for Murkowski.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLexington mayor launches bid for Congress Trump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics Meet the Iran hawk who could be Trump's next secretary of State MORE (Ky.) — Paul said he would have preferred a larger cut but hailed the bill for including repeal of the ObamaCare mandate. "I’ve fought for and received major changes for the better — and I plan to vote for this bill as it stands right now," he said Monday in an op-ed for Fox News. "I urge my colleagues to do the same."

Sen. David Perdue (Ga.) — Perdue said in a statement that “we are on track to deliver results and fundamentally change this tax code.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Overnight Finance: House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama | GOP leaders to consider Dec. 30 spending bill | Justices skeptical of ban on sports betting | Mulvaney won't fire official who sued him How four GOP senators guided a tax-bill victory behind the scenes MORE (Ohio) — Portman voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischMcConnell works to salvage tax bill The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill Senate ethics panel resumes Menendez probe after judge declares mistrial MORE (Idaho) — Risch said on the Senate floor that "under the plan released by the Senate Finance Committee, middle-class Americans will see a benefit in the form of a lower tax bill, which means more money for households to bring home."

Sen. Pat RobertsCharles (Pat) Patrick RobertsSenate passes tax overhaul, securing major GOP victory Top GOP senators say they have the votes to pass tax bill The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill MORE (Kan.) — Roberts voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Mike RoundsMarion (Mike) Michael RoundsTrump should fill CFPB vacancy with Export-Import chief Tax bill could fuel push for Medicare, Social Security cuts Senate passes tax overhaul, securing major GOP victory MORE (S.D.) — Rounds said on Twitter that the Senate tax bill would "create jobs, raise wages and provide a fairer tax system for South Dakotans."

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees GOP senator: Trump shouldn't pardon Flynn Trump should fill CFPB vacancy with Export-Import chief MORE (S.C.) — Scott voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyObstruction of justice watch: Trump attacks the FBI The Hill's 12:30 Report Alabama businesses fear Moore victory would hurt state economy: report MORE (Ala.) — Shelby said in a tweet that the Senate GOP tax plan will "grow the economy by 3.7 percent and create nearly 1 million new jobs across the nation."

Sen. Luther StrangeLuther Johnson StrangeGOP sen: ‘Just a fact’ Moore will face ethics complaint if elected Trevor Noah: Trump must be ‘morally degenerate’ to back Roy Moore Moore gets boost from Bannon in final days of campaign MORE (Ala.) — Strange voted for the bill in the Senate Budget Committee.

Sen. Dan SullivanDaniel Scott SullivanThe Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill Alaska senator proposes drilling in Arctic refuge Corker to hold hearing on president's nuclear weapons authority MORE (Alaska) — Sullivan is a "yes" vote.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneMcConnell names Senate GOP tax conferees Overnight Health Care: 3.6M signed up for ObamaCare in first month | Ryan pledges 'entitlement reform' next year | Dems push for more money to fight opioids Dems push for more money for opioid fight MORE (S.D.) — Thune said on Twitter that “the American people deserve a tax code that works for them, not against them. That grows their paychecks, instead of shrinking them. ... And that’s exactly what we’re going to give them, starting today.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee.

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisGOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration Grassley offers DACA fix tied to tough enforcement measures We are running out of time to protect Dreamers MORE (N.C.) — Tillis is a "yes" on the tax bill.

Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyNewly declassified memos detail extent of improper Obama-era NSA spying Overnight Tech: FCC won't fine Colbert over Trump joke | Trump budget slashes science funding | Net neutrality comment period opens Appeals court decision keeps lawsuit against NSA surveillance alive MORE (Pa.) — Toomey said in a statement that “this tax reform package is going to directly lower the tax bill, and therefore, be a pay raise for the overwhelming, vast majority of Pennsylvanians who are getting up every day and going to work and supporting their families. And that’s very good news.” He voted for the bill in the Senate Finance Committee and on the Budget Committee.

Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerSenator predicts Congress will wrap up tax work in two weeks The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on Senate tax bill US warship collides with Japanese tug boat MORE (Miss.) — “I am eager to roll up my sleeves — working nights if necessary, working weekends if necessary — to get this bill to the president’s desk,” Wicker said in a statement.