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25 Dem lawmakers file court brief backing English over Trump consumer bureau pick

25 Dem lawmakers file court brief backing English over Trump consumer bureau pick
© Camille Fine

Over two dozen Democratic lawmakers on Monday filed a brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in support of Leandra English's authority to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) over President Trump's appointment, Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyPoll: Majority disapproves of Trump's military parade plan Mulvaney travels to Middle East: report Pentagon concerns mounting about Trump’s proposed parade: report MORE.

Twenty-five current Senate and House lawmakers filed a friend of the court brief arguing that English, who was elevated by the CFPB's director on his last day, should serve as acting director of the consumer bureau until a permanent director, nominated by the president, is confirmed by the Senate. 

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Trump, in a move apparently meant to supersede English's appointment, named Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget, as acting director hours after English was promoted.

“President Trump is entitled to choose who the next Director of the Bureau will be, but he must nominate that person, and the Senate must agree to confirm him or her,” the lawmakers wrote. “Until that happens, Dodd-Frank makes clear who should be running the Bureau: its Deputy Director.”

They also criticized Trump's appointment of Mulvaney as "a designee who reflects the President’s policy preferences but has not been subject to the check of Senate confirmation."

Among some of the Democratic lawmakers to sign the court brief include Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerDemocrats now attack internet rules they once embraced Schumer: Trump budget would ‘cripple’ gun background checks Schumer: Senate Republicans' silence 'deafening' on guns, Russia MORE (N.Y.), Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump's SEC may negate investors' ability to fight securities fraud Schatz's ignorance of our Anglo-American legal heritage illustrates problem with government Dems ponder gender politics of 2020 nominee MORE (Mass.), Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownLawmaker interest in NAFTA intensifies amid Trump moves Dem senator shares photo praising LeBron James after Laura Ingraham attacks Trump gets recommendation for steep curbs on imported steel, risking trade war MORE (Ohio), House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiLawmakers feel pressure on guns Former Pelosi challenger: I have no 'interest in running for leadership again' Congress punts fight over Dreamers to March MORE (Calif.), House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerCongress punts fight over Dreamers to March Calls mount from Dems to give platform to Trump accusers  Citing deficits, House GOP to take aim at entitlements MORE (Md.), Rep. Maxine Waters (Calif.) and Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonPaul Ryan deletes tweet touting .50 pay hike after backlash Social media users slam Ryan for tweet on .50 pay hike Dems want info on Labor Dept hiding unfavorable report on impacts of tip-pooling rule MORE (Minn).

A dramatic showdown began on Friday after the White House and the CFPB butted heads over who will lead the Wall Street watchdog agency following Richard Cordray's resignation.

Before stepping down, Cordray named his chief of staff, English, to the deputy director position. The 2010 Dodd-Frank Act says the deputy director will lead the agency if there is not a permanent director.

Both officials claimed they are the rightful acting director of the CFPB on Monday, entangling current employees in an escalating legal dispute.