25 Dem lawmakers file court brief backing English over Trump consumer bureau pick

25 Dem lawmakers file court brief backing English over Trump consumer bureau pick
© Camille Fine

Over two dozen Democratic lawmakers on Monday filed a brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in support of Leandra English's authority to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) over President Trump's appointment, Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyWho watches the ‘watchdog?’ It's time for accountability for the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection Five GOP lawmakers mulling bid to lead conservative caucus On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Trump suggests China is easing pressure on North Korea because of trade fight | Mulvaney taps top aide as No. 2 at consumer bureau | House Republican to offer bill to curtail Trump's trade powers MORE.

Twenty-five current Senate and House lawmakers filed a friend of the court brief arguing that English, who was elevated by the CFPB's director on his last day, should serve as acting director of the consumer bureau until a permanent director, nominated by the president, is confirmed by the Senate. 

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Trump, in a move apparently meant to supersede English's appointment, named Mulvaney, the director of the Office of Management and Budget, as acting director hours after English was promoted.

“President Trump is entitled to choose who the next Director of the Bureau will be, but he must nominate that person, and the Senate must agree to confirm him or her,” the lawmakers wrote. “Until that happens, Dodd-Frank makes clear who should be running the Bureau: its Deputy Director.”

They also criticized Trump's appointment of Mulvaney as "a designee who reflects the President’s policy preferences but has not been subject to the check of Senate confirmation."

Among some of the Democratic lawmakers to sign the court brief include Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerThis week: GOP mulls vote on ‘abolish ICE’ legislation Red-state Dem tells Schumer to 'kiss my you know what' on Supreme Court vote Dem infighting erupts over Supreme Court pick MORE (N.Y.), Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSenate Dems protest vote on controversial court pick Dems call for hearings on Trump’s CFPB nominee to be put on hold Dems to propose legislation to prevent ICE from shackling pregnant women MORE (Mass.), Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSenate Dems press for info on any deals from Trump-Putin meeting Dems call for hearings on Trump’s CFPB nominee to be put on hold Senate Dems build huge cash edge in battlegrounds MORE (Ohio), House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiRoby wins Alabama GOP runoff, overcoming blowback from Trump criticism Mellman: (Mis)interpreting elections Overnight Health Care: Trump officials score a win against Planned Parenthood | Idaho residents to vote on Medicaid expansion | PhRMA, insurers weigh in on Trump drug pricing plan MORE (Calif.), House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerLinda Sanchez announces bid for Crowley’s spot atop Dem Caucus Hoyer: Trump committed 'treason' in Helsinki Pelosi wants party leadership elections post-Thanksgiving MORE (Md.), Rep. Maxine Waters (Calif.) and Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonHillicon Valley: Trump tries to quell Russia furor | Sparks fly at hearing on social media | First House Republican backs net neutrality bill | Meet the DNC's cyber guru | Sinclair defiant after merger setback Dem lawmaker blasts Amazon over sale of white-supremacist merchandise The Memo: Bannon says court win vindicates Trump MORE (Minn).

A dramatic showdown began on Friday after the White House and the CFPB butted heads over who will lead the Wall Street watchdog agency following Richard Cordray's resignation.

Before stepping down, Cordray named his chief of staff, English, to the deputy director position. The 2010 Dodd-Frank Act says the deputy director will lead the agency if there is not a permanent director.

Both officials claimed they are the rightful acting director of the CFPB on Monday, entangling current employees in an escalating legal dispute.