Sanders: At least GOP is being honest that tax bill is written for their donors

Sanders: At least GOP is being honest that tax bill is written for their donors
© Greg Nash

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersElection Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas House Dems launching Medicare for All Caucus Let's remove the legal shield from hackers who rob us of our civil rights MORE (I-Vt.) on Wednesday congratulated Republicans for being honest that the GOP tax bill was written for wealthy campaign contributors.

"This tax bill was written for Republicans’ wealthy campaign contributors. I want to congratulate my Republican colleagues for their honesty about that," Sanders tweeted Wednesday.

"There has not been one public hearing, no opportunity to hear from economists, governors, mayors or ordinary Americans who will be impacted by this tax bill. This is a sham," he said in a subsequent tweet.

In a video posted on Twitter, Sanders said that some Republicans have said publicly that if they don't pass this tax bill, their "wealthy friends will stop contributing."

"I appreciate that honesty," he said.

Last month, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump’s damage control falters Trump: 'I think I did great at the news conference' George Will calls Trump ‘sad, embarrassing wreck of a man’ MORE (R-S.C.) said "financial contributions will stop" for the GOP if the party doesn't pass tax reform.

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"The party fractures, most incumbents in 2018 will get a severe primary challenge, a lot of them will probably lose, the base will fracture, the financial contributions will stop, other than that it'll be fine," he said.

Rep. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsTrump tweet may doom House GOP effort on immigration House GOP discharge petition supporter says he likely won’t sign a second one Live coverage: High drama as hardline immigration bill fails, compromise vote delayed MORE (R-N.Y.) also acknowledged last month that he is facing pressure from donors to ensure the GOP tax-reform proposal gets done.

Collins last month had been describing the flurry of lobbying from special interests seeking to protect favored tax provisions when a reporter asked if donors are happy with the tax-reform proposal.

“My donors are basically saying, ‘Get it done or don’t ever call me again,’” Collins replied.

On Wednesday, Senate and House Republicans struck an "agreement in principle" on a sweeping tax-cut bill.

GOP sources familiar with the conference committee talks said negotiators are now just cleaning up some of the details on paying for last-minute changes to the bill, which would lower the top individual tax rate to 37 percent and set the corporate tax rate at 21 percent, according to a person briefed on the package.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpIran claims it rejected Trump meeting requests 8 times ESPY host jokes Putin was as happy after Trump summit as Ovechkin winning Stanley Cup Russian ambassador: Trump made ‘verbal agreements’ with Putin MORE and congressional Republicans have pitched their tax-reform effort as delivering much-needed tax cuts to the middle class and U.S. businesses that would boost U.S. economic growth.

Democrats, however, have argued that the tax overhaul would amount to a massive windfall for the wealthiest Americans.