Booker, Harris appointed to Senate Judiciary Committee

Booker, Harris appointed to Senate Judiciary Committee
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Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony Booker2020 hopefuls skeptical of criminal justice deal with Trump Sentencing reform deal heats up, pitting Trump against reliable allies Bernie Sanders socialism moves to Democratic mainstream MORE (D-N.J.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi Harris2020 hopefuls skeptical of criminal justice deal with Trump Kamala Harris prepares for moment in the spotlight Sentencing reform deal heats up, pitting Trump against reliable allies MORE (D-Calif.) were appointed to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, making them the first African-American members of the panel since the 1990s.

Harris, the second African-American woman elected to the Senate, also becomes the second black woman to serve on the powerful Judiciary panel.

Former Sen. Carol Moseley Braun (D-Ill.) sat on the Judiciary Committee in the 1990s. Booker will be the first black man to serve on the committee. 

“The Trump administration has repeatedly demonstrated its hostility to the ideals of civil rights and equal justice for all. As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I will make it my mission to check and balance President TrumpDonald John TrumpArizona GOP Senate candidate defends bus tour with far-right activist Alyssa Milano protests Kavanaugh in 'Handmaid's Tale' costume Bomb in deadly Yemen school bus attack was manufactured by US firm: report MORE and Attorney General Sessions,” Booker said in a statement.

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Booker testified against Sessions's nomination last year, the first time a sitting senator has testified against another sitting senator chosen for a Cabinet post.

Booker previously worked as a tenant lawyer, and served as a city council member and Newark mayor before his election to the Senate in 2013. Harris previously served as California's attorney general before joining the Senate. Both Democrats are viewed as potential 2020 presidential contenders.

The Judiciary Committee, which deals with nominations to the judiciary and Justice Department, is one of multiple congressional committees conducting separate investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. election.

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTo make the House of Representatives work again, make it bigger Reforms can stop members of Congress from using their public office for private gain Election Countdown: GOP worries House majority endangered by top of ticket | Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries | Parties fight for Puerto Rican vote in Florida | GOP lawmakers plan 'Freedom Tour' MORE (D-N.Y.) announced new committee assignments for some party members after former Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart Franken#BelieveAllWomen, in the Ellison era, looks more like #BelieveTheConvenientWomen The Hill's Morning Report — GOP seeks to hold Trump’s gains in Midwest states Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries MORE (D-Minn) officially resigned last week, and new Alabama Sen. Doug Jones (D) was sworn in.

Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Rep. Cedric RichmondCedric Levon RichmondDem requests DOJ probe on law enforcement use of facial recognition technology Clyburn: I'll run for Speaker if Pelosi doesn't have enough votes to win The Hill's Morning Report — GOP seeks to hold Trump’s gains in Midwest states MORE (D-La.) praised the new appointments, saying he urged Schumer to appoint a member of the caucus to replace Franken on the Judiciary Committee.

“The Congressional Black Caucus could not be more proud of both of our Senate members and know the experience and expertise they bring to the Committee will be beneficial for all Americans, especially those disproportionately targeted by the criminal justice system,” Richmond said in a statement.

The addition of Jones and Sen. Tina SmithTina Flint SmithOvernight Health Care: Senate takes up massive HHS spending bill next week | Companies see no sign of drugmakers cutting prices, despite Trump claims | Manchin hits opponent on ObamaCare lawsuit Companies report no signs of drugmakers cutting prices, despite Trump pledge Election Countdown: GOP worries House majority endangered by top of ticket | Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries | Parties fight for Puerto Rican vote in Florida | GOP lawmakers plan 'Freedom Tour' MORE (D-Minn.), Franken’s replacement, shrinks the Republican advantage on the Juciicary Committee and Finance Committee to one seat each.