Paul calls for filibuster of surveillance bill

Paul calls for filibuster of surveillance bill
© Greg Nash

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRepublicans have spent .5 million at Trump properties since he took office: report Ex-Virginia GOP Senate candidate shares offensive voicemail allegedly left by Charlottesville rally organizer GOP leaders: No talk of inviting Russia delegation to Capitol MORE (R-Ky.) on Thursday appeared to call for a filibuster to try and block a bill passed in the House that renews government surveillance powers. 

“No American should have their right to privacy taken away! #FILIBUSTER,” Paul tweeted.

The House voted Thursday morning to approve a bill that renews the National Security Agency's warrantless surveillance program, known as Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, with a few small changes. The bill passed 256-164.

The House also rejected an amendment proposed by Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashRecord numbers of women nominated for governor, Congress Watchdog files Hatch Act violation complaints against 10 Trump administration officials GOP lawmaker fires back at Trump: 'Tariffs are taxes' MORE (R-Mich.) that would have placed new limits on when the NSA and other agencies can surveil Americans without a warrant.

Just a few hours before the vote, President TrumpDonald John TrumpAl Gore: Trump has had 'less of an impact on environment so far than I feared' Trump claims tapes of him saying the 'n-word' don't exist Trump wanted to require staffers to get permission before writing books: report MORE roiled lawmakers by sending out a tweet that appeared to contradict his own administration’s opposition to Amash's proposal, though he later clarified his stance.

The bill now heads to the Senate, which is expected to take up the measure before the surveillance program expires on Jan. 19.

Paul previously threatened to filibuster “any long term extension of warrantless searches of American citizens.”

Last month Paul put a hold on one of Trump’s Justice Department appointees over concerns regarding the nominee’s views on surveillance. 

The nominee, John Demers, had previously spoken favorably about Section 702 surveillance, which privacy hawks like Paul have argued provides a backdoor for authorities to surveil American citizens.