Rubio on push for paid family leave: ‘We still have to work on members of my own party’

Rubio on push for paid family leave: ‘We still have to work on members of my own party’
© Greg Nash

Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioScottish beer company offering ‘tiny cans’ for Trump’s ‘tiny hands’ The Hill's Morning Report — Trump readies for Putin summit: 'He’s not my enemy’ Overnight Defense: Fallout from tense NATO summit | Senators push to block ZTE deal in defense bill | Blackwater founder makes new pitch for mercenaries to run Afghan war MORE (R-Fla.) is working with Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpIvanka Trump's fashion line dropped from Hudson's Bay due to 'performance' Trump's harsh immigration policies are a gift for human traffickers Let’s not talk about family leave without talking about child care MORE to craft a paid family leave plan that will appeal to fellow Republicans, Politico reported Sunday.

“We still have to work on members of my own party. I think there will be significant initial resistance to it, because it’s just not an issue that’s been identified with the Republican Party,” Rubio told the news outlet.

Rubio is reportedly considering a plan that would allow people to dip into Social Security benefits to take time off. Such a proposal would address concerns of Republicans who don’t want to raise taxes to pay for family leave.

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Rubio is still in the early stages of crafting a paid family leave package, according to Politico.

Rubio and Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeGOP moderates hint at smooth confirmation ahead for Kavanaugh GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE GOP senator moves to restart Pentagon report on NATO allies' spending MORE (R-Utah) have sought feedback from the president's eldest daughter on their ideas for a family leave program, Politico reported. 

Trump, who serves as a senior adviser to the president, outlined her support for paid family leave in an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal last month. She argued a national paid-leave program would be “an investment in America’s working families” that would spur the economy and benefit women in particular.

Members of both parties have recently put forth legislation to provide paid family leave, but they have been unable to reach consensus on the details of such a bill.