GOP senator: Republicans opposing bill protecting Mueller would back it if Clinton were president

Republican Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisOvernight Defense: More Trump drama over Russia | Appeals court rules against Trump on transgender ban | Boeing wins Air Force One contract | Military parade to reportedly cost M Deal to fix family separations hits snag in the Senate Senate adds members to pro-NATO group MORE (N.C.) said in a recent interview that lawmakers slamming his legislation to protect special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE would want the same bill if Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonState Dept: Russia’s allegations about American citizens ‘absolutely absurd’ Trump on possible sit-down with Mueller: 'I've always wanted to do an interview' Election Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas MORE were president.

“The same people who would criticize me for filing this bill would be absolutely angry if I wasn’t pounding the table for this bill if we were dealing with Hillary Clinton,” Tillis told Politico. “So spare me your righteous indignation.”

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Tillis, along with Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTrump’s damage control falters Trump: 'I think I did great at the news conference' George Will calls Trump ‘sad, embarrassing wreck of a man’ MORE (R-S.C.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerHouse backs resolution expressing support for ICE Dems to propose legislation to prevent ICE from shackling pregnant women Senate adds members to pro-NATO group MORE (D-N.J.) and Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsHillicon Valley: EU hits Google with record B fine | Trump tries to clarify Russia remarks | Sinclair changing deal to win over FCC | Election security bill gets traction | Robocall firm exposed voter data Overnight Defense: More Trump drama over Russia | Appeals court rules against Trump on transgender ban | Boeing wins Air Force One contract | Military parade to reportedly cost M Senate resolution backs intelligence community on Russian meddling MORE (D-Del.), last week introduced legislation that would restrict President TrumpDonald John TrumpIran claims it rejected Trump meeting requests 8 times ESPY host jokes Putin was as happy after Trump summit as Ovechkin winning Stanley Cup Russian ambassador: Trump made ‘verbal agreements’ with Putin MORE’s ability to fire the special counsel.

The bill would allow Mueller to have an “expedited judicial review” within 10 days of his possible dismissal to probe whether or not the firing was for a “good cause.”

Some Republican lawmakers have recently shown an increased enthusiasm for passing legislation to protect Mueller. The White House said last week Trump believes he has the power to fire the special counsel.

Tillis, in his interview, argued that the legislation could also help Republicans in the future should there be “a President Warren or a President Sanders or a President Booker,” referring to Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump pick to face grilling over family separations On The Money: Commerce to review uranium imports | Lawmakers urge Trump not to impose auto tariffs | White House wants steeper cuts to EPA funding | Google hit with massive B fine Election Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas MORE (D-Mass.), Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersElection Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas House Dems launching Medicare for All Caucus Let's remove the legal shield from hackers who rob us of our civil rights MORE (I-Vt.) and Booker. All three lawmakers have been floated as potential Democratic candidates for 2020.

“The only way you get these things done [is] when you have somebody who is willing to take the heat when you’re in the majority,” Tillis told Politico.