32 male senators back Senate women's calls to change harassment rules

32 male senators back Senate women's calls to change harassment rules
© Greg Nash

Thirty-two male senators have signed on to a letter demanding changes to how Congress handles sexual misconduct, joining a plea issued by the Senate's female members last month.

The letter, which was led and organized by Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyElizabeth Warren tours immigration center: 'It's a disturbing picture' Dem senator: If Nielsen doesn't reunite families, 'she should resign' Senate Dems call for Judiciary hearing on Trump's 'zero tolerance' MORE (D-Ore.), voices support for a letter sent by the Senate's 22 female members on March 28 calling for updates to the 1995 statute that set up the current method of handling workplace misconduct complaints on Capitol Hill.

"We join their call for the full Senate to immediately consider legislation that would update and strengthen the policies and procedures available for those who have been impacted by sexual harassment and discrimination in Congress," the male senators' letter reads.

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The letter was signed by 31 male members of the Senate Democratic Caucus. Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzIt is time for Trump to start selling space exploration Senate left in limbo by Trump tweets, House delays The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Immigration drama grips Washington MORE (R-Texas) was the only Republican to sign on to the letter. 

The letter calls on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFive things to know about efforts to repeal Obama's water rule Mulvaney aims to cement CFPB legacy by ensuring successor's confirmation Senate left in limbo by Trump tweets, House delays MORE (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerSchumer calls for Trump administration to appoint 'czar' to oversee family reunification Donald Trump Jr. headlines Montana Republican convention Montana's environmental lobby teams with governor to kill 600 jobs MORE (D-N.Y.) to bring to the floor legislation that would update current policies for handling sexual misconduct cases, streamline the process for reporting harassment and give staffers additional resources for filing reports.

“We strongly agree that the Senate should quickly take up legislation to combat sexual harassment on Capitol Hill,” Schumer said in response to the letter.

McConnell's spokesman also indicated support and said members would "continue to work on this issue" on a bipartisan basis.

"The Leader support members being personally, financially liable if they engage in sexual harassment," McConnell spokesman David Popp said in a statement.

The House has already changed its policies on sexual harassment cases and established an Office of Employee Advocacy to represent harassment victims. 

"If we are to lead by example, the Senate must revise current law to give the victims of sexual harassment and discrimination a more coherent, transparent, and fair process to tell their stories and pursue justice without fear of personal or professional ruin," the letter from the male senators reads.

Updated at 3:55 p.m.