Dems rip Trump concessions, 'embarrassing' rhetoric with Kim

Democrats are calling President TrumpDonald John TrumpBrennan fires new shot at Trump: ‘He’s drunk on power’ Trump aides discussed using security clearance revocations to distract from negative stories: report Trump tried to dissuade Melania from 'Be Best' anti-bullying campaign: report MORE's praise of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un "embarrassing" while criticizing him for offering concessions in exchange of vague promises from Pyongyang.

“In his haste to reach an agreement, President Trump elevated North Korea to the level of the United States while preserving the regime’s status quo," House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiSen. Warner to introduce amendment limiting Trump’s ability to revoke security clearances New Dem ad uses Paterno, KKK, affair allegations to tar GOP leaders House Dem: Party's aging leaders is 'a problem' MORE (D-Calif.) said in a scathing statement.

She said Trump had handed Kim concessions in return for “vague promises” and no “clear and comprehensive pathway to denuclearization and non-proliferation.”

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Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerTo make the House of Representatives work again, make it bigger Reforms can stop members of Congress from using their public office for private gain Election Countdown: GOP worries House majority endangered by top of ticket | Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries | Parties fight for Puerto Rican vote in Florida | GOP lawmakers plan 'Freedom Tour' MORE (D-N.Y.) also ripped Trump, saying on the Senate floor that the U.S. has “legitimized a brutal dictator.” 

“It is worrisome, very worrisome that this joint statement is so imprecise,” Schumer said. “What the U.S. has gained is vague and unverifiable at best. What North Korea has gained, however, is tangible and lasting ... We've legitimized a brutal dictator who's starved his own people," Schumer said. 

Other Democrats were even harsher in their criticism.

Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzGOP leader criticizes Republican senators for not showing up to work Senate takes shot at Trump, passes resolution affirming 'press is not the enemy of the people' Pentagon’s No. 2 official: Trump’s ‘Space Force’ could cost 'billions' MORE (D-Hawaii) said Trump's actions represented “an abdication of American leadership."

"Just embarrassing,” Schatz (D-Hawaii) wrote in a tweet.

Rep. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenDem lawmaker predicts Trump Jr., Kushner will be indicted by Mueller Dem leaders fend off calls to impeach Trump There was nothing remotely treasonous in Trump's performance with Putin MORE (D-Tenn.) and Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyDem senator: We will be in a 'banana republic' if Trump pardons Manafort 'and gets away with it' Senate gets to work in August — but many don’t show up Former Teacher of the Year wins Connecticut primary MORE (D-Conn.) were incredulous over Trump's choice of words.

Pointing to North Korea's long record of abusing its own citizens, Cohen questioned how Trump could talk of Kim loving his country.

Murphy said Trump was legitimizing North Korea's human rights abuses and faulted Trump for agreeing to end military exercises or "war games" with South Korea while talks with the North continue.

"U.S. gives up one of our biggest negotiating chips - military exercises. North Korea ends up BACKTRACKING on previous promises on denuclearization. What the hell?" Murphy tweeted. 

Trump after the summit called Kim a "very talented man" who "loves his country very much," adding that it was an "honor" to meet the North Korean leader. 

“A worthy negotiator ... a very worthy, very smart negotiator. We had a terrific day and we learned a lot about each other and our countries,” Trump said. 

The president's remarks were surely intended to set the table for fruitful negotiations aimed at denuclearizing North Korea, but they left him open to charges of hypocrisy given his own tough past rhetoric toward Kim.

U.S. college student Otto Warmbier died last year after being abused during a 17-month detention in North Korea.

But when he was asked about human rights abuses on Tuesday, Trump downplayed them, saying abuses happen in “a lot of places."

“I believe it's a rough situation over there,” Trump said during a press conference. “It's rough in a lot of places, by the way, not just there.”